Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 2-7

Contents

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pp. 8-9

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Preface

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pp. ix-xi

With little knowledge of what it would launch in the subsequent years of my life, I attended my first St. Louis Cardinals baseball game on June 19, 1974, at the age of four. After scurrying my legs as quickly as possible to stay with my family up the ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xiii

The author wishes to thank all the talented newspaper writers who have covered the Cardinals over the years, especially those whose resources contributed the most to this book—Neal Russo, Ed Wilks, Mike Eisenbath, and of ...

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1. Like Family

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pp. 1-7

The Cardinal players were uncommonly proud to be part of those [1960s] teams. . . . [T]hey won through intelligence, playing hard and aggressively, and because they had a sense of purpose that cut across racial lines in a way that was still extremely unusual in the ...

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2. Becoming a Business

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pp. 8-34

A few weeks after the Cardinals’ World Series loss, a cold, rainy evening blanketed the St. Louis area on November 3, 1968. Harry Caray, owner of the team’s beloved radio voice since World War II, was taking a nighttime stroll along ...

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3. “A Well-Paid Slave Is Still a Slave”

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pp. 35-64

the Cardinals on top, as Devine was ordered by Busch to continue the overhaul, and in no uncertain terms, the message was sent that no one’s job was ...

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4. Nephritis

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pp. 65-101

Just over a week after Shannon’s return to the lineup, Allen on May 23 was challenging for the National League lead with a .317 batting average. In addition, in returning across the diamond to the first base bag with Shannon resuming his duties at third ...

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5. “I’ll Never Throw a No-Hitter”

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pp. 102-136

Part of Devine’s plan to return the Cardinals to glory was to also return “small ball” as the team’s offensive core and to discard the experiment of home run baseball in St. Louis. Thus, four days after the close of the 1970 regular season on ...

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6. Loss of the Lefties

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pp. 137-169

Capped by his twenty-win season in 1971, Steve Carlton was indeed riding high by early 1972. He had invested ten years in the Cardinals’ organization, signing as a nineteen-year-old in 1963 and working for the last five full seasons ...

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7. Close to the Top Once Again

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pp. 170-196

By 1973, it had been nearly ten years since the Cardinals had faced the New York Yankees in their tremendous World Series clash, the last hurrah for the proud Yankee teams led by Mantle and Whitey Ford. As the Cardinals continued to ...

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8. Finished

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pp. 197-205

The winterlike conditions would make Jarry Park unplayable on Wednesday, October 2, 1974, the final day of the regular season. With club executives not wishing to pay for an extra night in the Queen Elizabeth Hotel in Montreal if unnecessary, the team ...

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Epilogue

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pp. 206-210

After falling short of the division title once again, Busch felt it was time to make a more drastic move. “There are times, regardless of one’s capabilities, when a different perspective is in order,” Gussie would say on October 5, 1976, three days after the ...

Notes

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pp. 211-221

Bibliography

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pp. 223-224

Appendix: National League East Standings, 1969–1975

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pp. 225-226

Index

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pp. 227-237