Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-1

Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 2-7

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 8-9

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xi

In the history of the United States nothing rankles more than the tensions and enmities of the Civil War. In this military history of the war in Missouri, I have tried to offer a balanced account of the conflict’s triumphs and defeats. At the same time I recognize that all ...

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xiii

This work began after a conversation some years ago with Clair Willcox, editor-in-chief of the University of Missouri Press. Willcox had long wanted to publish a one-volume military history of the Civil War in ...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-7

This is a work of traditional military history: it focuses on strategy, tactics, and terrain; on the organization, movement, and deployment of troops; and on the victories and defeats experienced by armies in the field. It requires some familiarity with the ...

read more

Chapter One: “Your First Allegiance”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 8-31

Small-scale slavery flourished in Missouri in 1860. In the state’s largest slaveholding counties, small slaveholders defined and defended a distinctive southern culture in close proximity to Free State communities in Illinois and Kansas—and in St. Louis, a booming ...

read more

Chapter Two: “Formidable Preparations . . . By the Enemy”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 32-53

As Claiborne Jackson and Sterling Price left St. Louis to make their way back to Jefferson City, they must have recognized that their ability to control Missouri’s great city had eluded them. St. Louis was now the hub of Federal authority in the Trans-Mississippi West and in ...

read more

Chapter Three: “In the Valley of Wilson’s Creek”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 54-98

On the morning of July 6, Sterling Price and Ben McCulloch continued their advance into Missouri. They were well on their way from Neosho to Carthage when they received word that Claiborne Jackson had pushed aside Franz Sigel the previous ...

read more

Chapter Four: “Tell My Wife that I Died like a Brave Man for Missouri”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 99-131

For Price, the march north from Springfield was triumphal. McCulloch’s disdain continued to rankle, but the Texas Ranger was now back in Arkansas, and Price returned to the heartland of Missouri with State Guardsmen who had fought well at Wilson’s Creek. With Lyon ...

read more

Chapter Five: “There Is No Rebel Flag Now Flying in Missouri”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 132-178

If Ulysses Grant ever met James B. Eads he made no mention of it in his Memoirs. While Grant struggled to make a living in St. Louis in the 1850s, Eads lived in comfortable retirement in his city home on Compton Hill. But metaphorically ...

read more

Chapter Six: “He Saw the Rebellion Vanishing before Him”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 179-203

In the year that separated Shelby’s raid (October 1863) from Price’s expedition (October 1864), Federal forces adopted a determined effort to coordinate the activities of armies in the East and West and to carve the Confederacy into militarily disjointed ...

read more

Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 205-208

Frank Blair, arguably the most aggressive Unionist in Missouri during the secession crisis, returned to the state in June 1865 after three years of military service in the field. Blair had led the fight against Governor Claiborne Jackson’s policy of armed ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 209-232

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 233-237