Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. 2-7

Contents

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pp. vii-x

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Introduction

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pp. 1-14

The American Civil War was primarily a domestic conflict, pitting the southeastern slaveholding states against the more urban and industrial North and the antislavery West. Other nations, including major powers such as France and Britain and less globally significant...

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Chapter 1: Prewar Tensions between Spain and the American South

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pp. 15-33

The fifty years before the American Civil War saw increasing tensions between Spain and the United States, with conflicts over independence movements within the Spanish empire, expansionist ambitions among Southern US politicians, and other diplomatic and...

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Chapter 2: Spain in the Mid-Nineteenth Century

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pp. 34-54

Even after the end of its sixteenth-century Golden Age, Spain continued to be globally significant because of the extent and importance of its territorial possessions. The country had been in relative decline for many years, and the Napoleonic years were cataclysmic, causing...

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Chapter 3: The First Year of War—Flirtation with Alliance

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pp. 55-83

During the first phase of the Civil War, when Confederate optimism in battlefield victories rode high, Southern leaders put little faith and fewer resources in diplomacy. “King Cotton Diplomacy,” the conviction that the South held the upper hand in relations with...

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Chapter 4: Spain’s Dominican Enterprise

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pp. 84-106

Spain’s most spectacular attempt to revive its imperial glory came in March 1861 when it annexed the Caribbean state of Santo Domingo, allegedly to protect the Dominicans from potential invasion from Haiti. Santo Domingo, the eastern two-thirds of the island of Hispaniola...

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Chapter 5: King Cotton, the French Temptation, and Spain First

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pp. 107-122

During the American Civil War, it was France that seemed most likely to lend aid to the Confederate cause, given the open sympathy toward the South expressed by Napoleon III and his ability to direct his own foreign policy without much deference to the legislature. In...

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Chapter 6: Collaboration in the Caribbean

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pp. 123-135

The Caribbean Sea was an area of great concern for the United States during the American Civil War. Confederate blockade runners and surface raiders carried the war through coastal waters and into the Atlantic. Especially during 1861 and 1862, when the US Navy was...

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Chapter 7: Opportunism and Delay

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pp. 136-148

Spain’s hesitancy to join in an alliance with the Confederacy reflected not only its weak international position and subordination to France and Britain but also a feeling of deep ambivalence about the Confederacy. Spain believed that the South, if successful, would...

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Conclusion

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pp. 149-156

The American Civil War officially ended for Spain even later than it did for the Confederacy, when, on June 5, 1865, Spain withdrew its recognition of Confederate belligerent rights. Even though this gesture was a formality, coming almost two months after General Robert...

Notes

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pp. 157-176

Bibliography

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pp. 177-184

Index

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pp. 185-188

Back Cover

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pp. 200-200