Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 2-5

Contents

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pp. v-vi

Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-xii

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Introduction

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pp. 1-6

My acquaintance with the memoirs of Conrad S. Babcock came slowly, curiously, and for a while without a great deal of understanding. I had come on the diary of Major General William M. Wright, the commanding general of the Eighty-ninth Division in World War I, discovered that...

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One: Manila and Iloilo

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pp. 7-22

Following the twentieth degree parallel of north latitude into the setting sun, the Rio de Janeiro passed the northern end of the island of Luzon and then, turning to the left or port as sailors once called it, steamed down the western side of the island. What a magnificent sight it was and still...

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Two: Insurrection

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pp. 23-41

Ever since the occupancy of Manila in August by the expeditionary force there had been friction between the Americans and the Filipinos over the question as to what were the outer limits of the American lines. Deliberate encroachments upon the lines were said to have been made...

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Three: Assignments

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pp. 42-55

The first two chapters of Babcock’s memoir are clear in their themes, the initial chapter covering the arrival at Manila and Iloilo, the second the Insurrection. The third is reminiscence of Troop F of the 1st Cavalry —the third its tradition of notable actions and commanders...

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Four: More of the Same

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pp. 56-71

In November, 1907, the regiment less three troops left by rail for San Francisco and the Philippine Islands. At Fort Sam Houston one troop (H) and at Fort Clark two troops (D and I) remained to care for all the horses left behind for the 3rd Cavalry which was coming from the Philippines. Caring for some five hundred animals at Fort Clark, in addition to the ...

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Five: Soissons I

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pp. 72-86

On the morning of July 15, 1918, I left Paris and, in the afternoon, rejoined the 18th Infantry, which had moved to the Forêt de Compiègne. There I learned that the division was scheduled for an early attack against the enemy’s entrenched position west of Soissons and south of the Aisne000

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Six: Soissons II

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pp. 87-106

At 3:50 a.m., July 19, I was roused from a heavy sleep on the dirt floor of our immense cavern and handed a long typewritten order from the brigade to attack at 4:00 a.m.; along with a mass of useless information to us was the important item that for forty-five minutes or until 4:45 a.m...

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Seven: Tactics

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pp. 107-125

On August 5, Colonel G. C. Barnhardt (W.P. 1892), a classmate of General Summerall’s, came to my headquarters and relieved me from the command of my fine regiment. It was a bitter blow.
In the division telegram asking that I be relieved, it was recommended that I be transferred to another division. Fortunately for me, a good...

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Eight: The New Army

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pp. 126-142

On October 12, 1918, the Eighty-ninth Division was transferred from the III to the V corps and ordered to march across country to the vicinity of Eclisfontaine and Epinonville about ten miles to the northwest (due west of Montfaucon). Leaving the Recicourt area on the morning of...

Suggested Further Reading about World War I

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pp. 143-148

Index

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pp. 149-152