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Native and Spanish New Worlds
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Spanish-led entradas—expeditions bent on the exploration and control of new territories—took place throughout the sixteenth century in what is now the southern United States. Although their impact was profound, both locally and globally, detailed analyses of these encounters are notably scarce. Focusing on several major themes—social, economic, political, military, environmental, and demographic—the contributions gathered here explore not only the cultures and peoples involved in these unique engagements but also the wider connections and disparities between these borderlands and the colonial world in general during the first century of Native–European contact in North America. Bringing together research from both the southwestern and southeastern United States, this book offers a comparative synthesis of Native–European contacts and their consequences in both regions. The chapters also engage at different scales of analysis, from locally based research to macro-level evaluations, using documentary, paleoclimatic, and regional archaeological data.
No other volume assembles such a wide variety of archaeological, ethnohistorical, environmental, and biological information to elucidate the experience of Natives and Europeans in the early colonial world of Northern New Spain, and the global implications of entradas during this formative period in borderlands history.

Spanish-led entradas—expeditions bent on the exploration and control of new territories—took place throughout the sixteenth century in what is now the southern United States. Although their impact was profound, both locally and globally, detailed analyses of these encounters are notably scarce. Focusing on several major themes—social, economic, political, military, environmental, and demographic—the contributions gathered here explore not only the cultures and peoples involved in these unique engagements but also the wider connections and disparities between these borderlands and the colonial world in general during the first century of Native–European contact in North America. Bringing together research from both the southwestern and southeastern United States, this book offers a comparative synthesis of Native–European contacts and their consequences in both regions. The chapters also engage at different scales of analysis, from locally based research to macro-level evaluations, using documentary, paleoclimatic, and regional archaeological data.

No other volume assembles such a wide variety of archaeological, ethnohistorical, environmental, and biological information to elucidate the experience of Natives and Europeans in the early colonial world of Northern New Spain, and the global implications of entradas during this formative period in borderlands history.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. 1-1
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. 2-5
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vii
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  1. Editors’ Preface
  2. pp. ix-xii
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  1. 1. Entradas in Context: Sixteenth-Century Indigenous and Imperial Trajectories in the American South
  2. pp. 1-27
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  1. Section I. Native Perspectives
  2. pp. 29-45
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  1. 2. Crossing the Corn Line: Steps toward an Understanding of Zuni Communities and Entradas in the Sixteenth-Century Southwest
  2. pp. 31-44
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  1. Section II. Historiography
  2. pp. 45-61
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  1. 3. Catch as Catch Can: The Evolving History of the Contact Period Southwest, 1838–Present
  2. pp. 47-62
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  1. 4. Contact Era Studies and the Southeastern Indians
  2. pp. 63-77
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  1. Section III. Climatic Influences and Impacts
  2. pp. 79-95
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  1. 5. The Role of Climate in Early Spanish–Native AmericanInteractions in the US Southwest
  2. pp. 81-98
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  1. 6. The Factors of Climate and Weather in Sixteenth-Century La Florida
  2. pp. 99-120
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  1. Section IV. Disease
  2. pp. 121-137
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  1. 7. Regarding Sixteenth-Century Native Population Change in the Northern Southwest
  2. pp. 123-139
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  1. 8. Entradas and Epidemics in the Sixteenth-Century Southeast
  2. pp. 140-151
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  1. Section V. Political Organization
  2. pp. 153-169
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  1. 9. Sixteenth-Century Indigenous Settlement Dynamics in the Upper Middle Rio Grande Valley
  2. pp. 155-169
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  1. 10. The Interior South at the Time of Spanish Exploration
  2. pp. 170-188
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  1. 11. Inventing Florida: Constructing a Colonial Society in an Indigenous Landscape
  2. pp. 189-201
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  1. Section VI. Conflict
  2. pp. 203-219
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  1. 12. Contest and Violence on the Northern Borderlands Frontier: Patterns of Native–European Conflict in the Sixteenth-Century Southwest
  2. pp. 205-230
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  1. 13. Conflict, Violence, and Warfare in La Florida
  2. pp. 231-247
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  1. Section VII. Discussion
  2. pp. 249-265
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  1. 14. Honor and Hierarchies: Long-Term Trajectories in the Pueblo and Mississippian Worlds
  2. pp. 251-273
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  1. 15. History, Prehistory, and the Contact Experience
  2. pp. 274-283
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  1. Appendix A: Annual Values and Equivalent Z-Scores for the MRG Basin and San Francisco Peaks Chronologies
  2. pp. 285-294
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 295-304
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  1. References Cited
  2. pp. 305-365
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  1. About the Contributors
  2. pp. 367-373
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 375-382
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