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Reading Embodied Citizenship
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Reading Embodied Citizenship brings disability to the forefront, illuminating its role in constituting what counts as U.S. citizenship. Drawing from major figures in American literature, including Mark Twain, Flannery O'Connor, Carson McCullers, and David Foster Wallace, as well as introducing texts from the emerging canon of disability studies, Emily Russell demonstrates the place of disability at the core of American ideals. Russell examines literature to explore and unsettle long-held assumptions about American citizenship.

Table of Contents

  1. Frontmatter
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  1. Contents
  2. p. v
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-22
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  1. 1 Domesticating the Exceptional: Those Extraordinary Twins and the Limits of American Individualism
  2. pp. 23-58
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  1. 2 “Marvelous and Very Real”: The Grotesque in The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter and Wise Blood
  2. pp. 59-96
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  1. 3 The Uniform Body: Spectacles of Disability and the Vietnam War
  2. pp. 97-130
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  1. 4 Conceiving the Freakish Body: Reimagining Reproduction in Geek Love and My Year of Meats
  2. pp. 131-169
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  1. 5. Some Assembly Required: The Disability Politics of Infinite Jest
  2. pp. 170-197
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  1. Conclusion: Inclusion, Fixing, and Legibility
  2. pp. 198-206
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 207-226
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 227-242
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 243-253
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  1. About the Author
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