In this Book

African Americans in South Texas History
summary

The history of South Texas is more racially and ethnically complex than many people realize. As a border area, South Texas has experienced some especially interesting forms of racial and ethnic intersection, influenced by the relatively small number of blacks (especially in certain counties), the function and importance of the South Texas cattle trade, proximity to Mexico, and the history of anti-black violence. The essays in African Americans in South Texas History give insight into this fascinating history.
The articles in this volume, written over a span of almost three decades, were chosen for their readability, scholarship, and general interest.
Contributors:
Jennifer Borrer
Edward Byerly
Judith Kaaz Doyle
Rob Fink
Robert A. Goldberg
Kenneth Wayne Howell
Larry P. Knight
Rebecca A. Kosary
David Louzon
Sarah R. Massey
Jeanette Nyda Mendelssohn Passty
Janice L. Sumler-Edmond
Cary D. Wintz
Rue Wood

" . . . a valuable addition to the literature chronicling the black experience in the land of the Lone Star. While previous studies have concentrated on regions most reflective of Dixie origins, this collection examines the tri-ethnic area of Texas adjoining Mexico wherein cotton was scarce and cattle plentiful. Glasrud has assembled an excellent group of essays from which readers will learn much."-L. Patrick Hughes, professor of history, Austin Community College

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. c-c
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  1. Title Page, Copyright Page
  2. pp. i-iv
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Foreword
  2. pp. vii-x
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xi-xiv
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-28
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  1. Defending the Unnecessary
  2. pp. 29-45
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  1. Just Southwest of Dixie
  2. pp. 46-64
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  1. “Wantonly Maltreated and Slain,Simply Because They Are Free”
  2. pp. 65-84
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  1. After Emancipation
  2. pp. 85-98
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  1. The Forging of the African AmericanCommunity in Corpus Christi, Texas,1865–1900
  2. pp. 99-132
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  1. Lola and Leon Houck versus theSouthern Pacific Railway Company
  2. pp. 133-150
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  1. The Colored Trainmen of America
  2. pp. 151-176
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  1. Divided We Stand
  2. pp. 177-205
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  1. Maury Maverick and Racial Politicsin San Antonio, Texas, 1938–1941
  2. pp. 206-241
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  1. The Houston Eagles andthe End of the Negro Leagues
  2. pp. 242-256
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  1. Corpus Christi’s Galvan Ballroom
  2. pp. 257-279
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  1. Racial Change on the Southern Periphery
  2. pp. 280-312
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  1. “A Pearl of Great Price”
  2. pp. 313-328
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  1. Blacks in South Texas
  2. pp. 329-334
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 335-338
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  1. Permissions
  2. pp. 339-340
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 341-358
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