In this Book

Lelooska
summary
Don Smith, or Lelooska, (1933-1996) was well-known in Washington and Oregon as an artist and storyteller. Of “mixed-blood” Cherokee heritage, he was adopted as an adult by the prestigious Kwakiutl Sewid clan. Initially producing Indian curio items for sale to tourists, he emerged in the late 1950s as one of a handful of artists who proved critical in the renaissance of Northwest Coast Indian art.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Frontmatter
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  1. Contents
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. vii-xi
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xiii-xiv
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  1. Note to the Reader
  2. pp. xv-xvii
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  1. 1. A Life (Un)masked: Placing Personal Narrative
  2. pp. 3-19
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  1. 2. Growing Up Indian
  2. pp. 20-36
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  1. 3. Family across the Generations
  2. pp. 37-76
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  1. 4. Learning from People
  2. pp. 77-120
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  1. 5. “A Kind of Hunger”
  2. pp. 121-146
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  1. 6. Openings to New Worlds
  2. pp. 147-171
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  1. 7. Producing Art
  2. pp. 172-192
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  1. 8. Learning from Experience
  2. pp. 193-202
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  1. 9. A Family Complex
  2. pp. 203-213
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  1. 10. New Foes, Old Friends
  2. pp. 214-230
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  1. Conclusion
  2. pp. 231-236
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 237-263
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 265-274
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 275-283
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