In this Book

Revolt
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Published in cooperation with the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Southern Methodist University. <br><br> The Pueblo Revolt of 1680 is the most renowned colonial uprisings in the history of the American Southwest. Traditional text-based accounts tend to focus on the revolt and the Spaniards' reconquest in 1692--completely skipping over the years of indigenous independence that occurred in between. Revolt boldly breaks out of this mold and examines the aftermath of the uprising in colonial New Mexico, focusing on the radical changes it instigated in Pueblo culture and society. <br><br>  In addition to being the first book-length history of the revolt that incorporates archaeological evidence as a primary source of data, this volume is one of a kind in its attempt to put these events into the larger context of Native American cultural revitalization. Despite the fact that the only surviving records of the revolt were written by Spanish witnesses and contain certain biases, author Matthew Liebmann finds unique ways to bring a fresh perspective to Revolt. <br><br>  Most notably, he uses his hands-on experience at Ancestral Pueblo archaeological sites--four Pueblo villages constructed between 1680 and 1696 in the Jemez province of New Mexico--to provide an understanding of this period that other treatments have yet to accomplish. By analyzing ceramics, architecture, and rock art of the Pueblo Revolt era, he sheds new light on a period often portrayed as one of unvarying degradation and dissention among Pueblos. A compelling read, Revolt's "blood-and-thunder" story successfully ties together archaeology, history, and ethnohistory to add a new dimension to this uprising and its aftermath.
 

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. 1-1
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
  2. pp. 2-7
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. List of Illustrations
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xi-xiv
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  1. Chronology
  2. pp. xv-16
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  1. Maps
  2. pp. xvi-xx
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  1. 1. Introduction: Archaeology, Anthropology, and the Pueblo Revolt
  2. pp. 1-26
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  1. Part I. The Genesis of a Prophecy: 1598–1680
  2. pp. 27-28
  1. 2. Life under the Mission Bell
  2. pp. 29-49
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  1. 3. “Apostatizing from the Holy Faith”: The Pueblo Revolt of 1680
  2. pp. 50-68
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  1. Part II. The Era of Pueblo Independence: 1680–92
  2. pp. 69-70
  1. 4. The Aftermath of Revolution
  2. pp. 71-82
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  1. 5. Rebuilding the Pueblo World, 1681–1683
  2. pp. 83-108
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  1. 6. Dismembering and Remembering: The Simulacra of Post-Revolt Settlements
  2. pp. 109-134
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  1. 7. Catachresis and Catechesis: Pueblo Appropriations of Colonial Culture during the Spanish Interregnum
  2. pp. 135-158
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  1. 8. From Apostates to Compadres: Colonial Ambivalence in a Time of “Unceasing War,” 1687–1692
  2. pp. 159-178
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  1. Part III. Return of the Castyilash: 1692–1696
  2. pp. 179-180
  1. 9. Reconquista de Sangre
  2. pp. 181-206
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  1. 10. Conclusion: Popay’s Long Shadow
  2. pp. 207-214
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  1. Epilogue: The Pueblo Revolt of 1696
  2. pp. 215-220
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 221-238
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 239-274
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 275-288
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  1. About the Author
  2. pp. 310-310
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