Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 2-7

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-9

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-13

The essays in this collection, the latest addition to the series on Perspectives on the Art and Architectural History of the United States Capitol, originated in a conference held by the U.S. Capitol Historical Society in 2002 at the French Embassy’s La Maison...

read more

The French Connection in Washington, D.C.: Context and Issues

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-35

If an account of the French artistic presence in the United States is of little value without multiple references to the nation’s capital, a narrow focus on “Paris on the Potomac” would be equally sterile. This essay takes us on a journey through three periods when French ideas about...

read more

Remembering Paris: The Jefferson-Latrobe Collaboration at the Capitol

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 36-55

One of the most fascinating chapters in the history of the Capitol involves the collaboration between America’s most architecturally sophisticated president, Thomas Jefferson, and the first genius to practice architecture in America, Benjamin Henry Latrobe. Their association at the Capitol began in 1803 and flourished...

read more

“The Son by the Side of the Father”: David d’Angers’s Busts of Washington and Lafayette in the Rotunda of the U.S. Capitol

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 56-76

About 1827, the great nineteenth-century French portrait sculptor Pierre-Jean David d’Angers (1788–1856) produced a bust of George Washington, probably in marble, which was presented to the United States by the French nation in late 1827 or 1828. The French costs related to the bust were funded through national...

read more

Private Homes, Public Lives: Francophilia among Government Officers and the Washington Elite

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 77-116

After the Civil War, Washington, D.C., experienced an economic expansion that triggered a period of feverish building and configured the small urban center as a residential city par excellence. A concerted effort on the part of the territorial and federal governments made the city primarily the seat of government...

read more

Interpreting the Influence of Paris on the Planning of Washington, D.C., 1870–1930

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 117-137

In 1910, John Merven Carrère, a Parisian-trained American architect whom we shall meet later as a consulting architect of the U.S. Capitol complex, wrote an article stating that “learning from Paris made Washington outstanding among American...

read more

Appendix: Architects and the French Connection in Washington, D.C.

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 139-155

The following listing of designers and architectural offices active in Washington, D.C. (including members of the Commission of Fine Arts), with a French affiliation and a checklist of their French-influenced works in Washington, D.C., is presented in four sections: the first lists those who received the...

Contributors

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 157-171

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 159-164