Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

List of Maps

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pp. vii-viii

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Introduction

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pp. 1-6

Historians are continually trying to impose order on the past, to simplify events that would otherwise appear chaotic. By nature and by training, they are inclined to search for first causes that would explain all subsequent events. Among military historians ...

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1. Japanese Advances and Retreats

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pp. 7-21

Few examples in the history of warfare would match the success of the Japanese during the first six months of World War II. Once Imperial General Headquarters made the decision that Japan's future could be secured only by aggressive ...

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2. Allied Planning

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pp. 22-38

The need to neutralize Rabaul was constantly in the minds of the planners in Australia, Hawaii, and Washington throughout 1942. Any "Europe first" policy of the Joint Chiefs, which resulted in a relative shortage of men and materiel for the Pacific theaters. Even with ...

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3. The Treasuries and Choiseul

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pp. 39-59

Admiral Halsey's final decision, relayed to General MacArthur on 1 October, making Empress Augusta Bay the prime target on Bougainville confirmed the importance of the Treasury Islands. As early as mid-September these two small islands, Mono and Stirling, lying ...

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4. Establishing the Beachhead

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pp. 60-77

The Japanese were fully aware of how Allied activity in the Solomons endangered Rabaul, their main naval and air base in the southern Pacific, but they were in a difficult position. The loss of New Georgia and the occupation of Kolombangara had left only the two ...

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5. Naval Actions

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pp. 78-92

The major threat to the beachhead established by the marines on Bougainville would not come from the Japanese army units there. General Hyakutaki was very slow to react to the lodgment at Cape Torokina, and even had he been more ...

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6. Expanding the Perimeter

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pp. 93-119

The marines on the narrow beachhead adjacent to Cape Torokina were totally unaware of the crucial naval and air battles that did so much to secure their operations. They were, almost to a man, tired and wet and still apprehensive that the ...

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7. The Rear Areas

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pp. 120-131

As the army and marine riflemen at first expanded and then consoli dated the perimeter, personnel in the rear areas were engaged in a variety of tasks that enabled the frontline troops to carry out their missions. Of all the noncombat ...

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8. Consolidating the Perimeter

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pp. 132-148

The forward movement of the 3d Marine Division and the subsequent XIV Corps, had replaced General Geiger on 15 December. This was the first step in Admiral Halsey's revised plan to relieve all marine units on Bougainville and ...

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9. The Japanese Counterattack

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pp. 149-168

General Hyakutake's offensive began early in the morning of 8 March with the bombardment of parts of the beachhead and the Piva air strips. The Japanese artillery concentrated its fire on Piva Yoke instead of the forward areas of the ...

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10. The 93d Division Affair

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pp. 169-183

The Japanese were in full retreat by 28 March. The Magata force, with an estimated strength of over fifteen hundred men, utilized the Numa Numa Trail and withdrew toward the northern part of Bougainville. The remnants of the ...

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11. The Final Phase

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pp. 184-211

Actions elsewhere in the South and Southwest Pacific theaters during the spring of 1944 would relegate the Bougainville operations to tertiary importance. The occupation of the Green Islands in February, followed by the seizure ...

Glossary

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pp. 212-213

Notes

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pp. 214-224

Bibliography

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pp. 225-228

Index

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pp. 229-237

Illustrations

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