Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 2-7

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-9

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

This book was made possible by the generous support of a host of individuals and organizations. The research and writing that grew into this book started as a project at the Program on Science and Global Security at Princeton...

List of Acronyms

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xiii

read more

1. Controlling the Proliferation of Nuclear Knowledge: An Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-20

In October of 1996, Vladimir Nechai committed suicide. His death was newsworthy, but not because of the means; suicide was not so unusual in Russia, largely due to the widespread financial deprivation in the years following...

read more

2. The Proliferation Threat

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 21-67

The ability of U.S. policy to stop or mitigate the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) expertise depends, in no small part, on the fit between programmatic response and threat. Obviously, policy cannot succeed if it fails to understand...

read more

3. The Domestic Political Context of Threat Reduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 69-108

U.S. fears about the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) expertise date from the waning days of the Soviet Union in 1990. It was at this time that the U.S. government first became concerned about the security of Soviet...

read more

4. Early Conversion Efforts at the Defense Department

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 109-142

After the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Defense Department funded three efforts aimed at addressing the proliferation of weapons knowledge. This chapter describes these conversion and redirection efforts, discusses the threats that came...

read more

5. The Science Centers

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 143-193

In early 1992, U.S. Secretary of State James Baker announced plans to create a center in Moscow that would help former Soviet experts with skills relevant to weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and missiles redirect their skills...

read more

6. Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 195-240

In the early 1990s, as the State Department struggled to get the necessary Russian and Ukrainian approval for the Science Centers, the U.S. nuclear weapons laboratories became involved in a parallel effort to create their own program...

read more

7. The Nuclear Cities Initiative

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 241-289

Despite the activities of the Science Centers and Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (IPP), by the mid-1990s, there was growing concern about economic conditions in Russia’s ten “closed nuclear cities.”1 Seeking a decidedly different...

read more

8. Conclusion: U.S. National Security, Institutional Interests, and the Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons Expertise

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 291-312

Students of public policy are well aware of the importance of institutional interest. Yet it is often assumed that the gravity of national security and “high politics” causes organizational imperatives to fade away. The case studies in this book...

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 313-340

About the Author

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 341-359

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 343-358

Belfer Center Studies in International Security

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 361-364

Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 367-385