Cover, Title Page, and Copyright

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pp. 1-7

Contents

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pp. 8-9

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

I have, over time, received grants from Pomona College, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and in particular and most recently the Japan Foundation, all of which contributed to the creation of this book. I thank them all warmly for their encouragement and their financial support. Professor Uchiyama...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-9

The plays in this collection represent, to a certain extent, a somewhat idiosyncratic selection of my own. I have found all of them affecting and compelling works, and even from my first encounter with them in the theatre I felt that they would survive the process of translation rather well and perhaps would...

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Chapter 1. The Genji Vanguard in Ōmi Province

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pp. 10-46

One of the great history-based plays (jidaimono), The Genji Vanguard in Ōmi Province (Ōmi Genji Senjin Yakata), came to the stage of the Takemoto puppet theatre (the Takemoto-za) in Osaka on the ninth day of the Twelfth Month of 1769.1 It was so well received by audiences that it was adapted to Kabuki less than...

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Chapter 2. Mount Imo and Mount Se: Precepts for Women

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pp. 47-75

Mount Imo and Mount Se: Precepts for Women (Imoseyama Onna Teikin) is one of those daylong jidaimono history dramas for which the Bunraku and Kabuki theatres are noted. It was written originally for the puppets and first performed on the twenty-eighth day of the First (lunar) Month of 1771 at the Takemoto-za in...

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Chapter 3. Vengeance at Iga Pass

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pp. 76-235

There have been many vendettas in Japanese history, but three in particular stand out and have been commemorated in eighteenth-century popular theatre. The first is the twelfth-century Soga brothers’ revenge for the murder of their father, a tale that has been told in many forms but is best known in drama by the...

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Chapter 4. The True Tale of Asagao

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pp. 236-280

Kabuki, through its penchant for borrowing from the puppets, has been the beneficiary of a large number of works that were written for the puppet theatre, plays that have gone on to become favorites in both these traditional theatres. This interaction, however, has not been one-sided. The puppet theatre, particularly...

Notes

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pp. 281-300

Bibliography

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pp. 301-303