Cover

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pp. 1-5

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Series Foreword

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pp. vii-viii

We are pleased to present the sixty-first in the series Linguistic Inquiry Monographs. These monographs present new and original research beyond the scope of the article. We hope they will benefit our field by bringing to it perspectives that will stimulate further research and insight. ...

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Preface

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pp. ix-x

For listening to my ramblings at various stages of this work, I am indebted to Julie Brittain, Carrie Dyck, Alison Henry, Alana Johns, David Pesetsky, Yvan Rose, Gerard Van Herk, Doug Wharram, and Jan- Wouter Zwart. I am particularly grateful to Brittain for her editorial comments on earlier drafts. ...

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1. Introduction

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pp. 1-6

The central concern of this study is syntactic movement, and more precisely, the forces that drive such movement. Chomsky’s (1975, 1957) analyses showed that no description of natural language syntax will be adequate unless it includes some notion of movement operations in a syntactic derivation. ...

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2. Provocation

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pp. 7-40

The central claim I wish to put forward is that most syntactic movement occurs as a result of a complex syntactic operation that I call provocation. The internal details and mechanism of this operation will be elucidated shortly, but the effect of provocation must be understood from the outset. ...

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3. Provocative Case Studies

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pp. 41-62

The movement model presented in chapter 2 treats movement to specifier positions, clitic positions, and head positions as reflexes of the same fundamental operations. In some configurations, therefore, the situation may arise where provocation may, in principle, trigger head movement, specifier movement, or clitic movement. ...

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4. Force and Provocation

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pp. 63-118

The idea that movement of heads and phrases is driven by the same mechanism is central to the notion of provocation presented in the preceding two chapters. The uniqueness of the mechanism has perhaps been overlooked in many analyses because independent principles of grammar conspire to make head movement ...

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5. Provoking Trace Deletion

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pp. 119-154

The central claim in the analyses I am proposing is that probe-driven movement is based on a complex operation that generates a distinct copy of a category containing the goal. It is precisely because the two copies formed are independent linguistic objects that the copy must merge with the original tree structure that contains its source. ...

Notes

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pp. 155-164

References

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pp. 165-174

Index

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pp. 175-176