Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. 2-7

Contents

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pp. 8-9

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Preface

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pp. xi-xii

In its conception and its writing, this book has been a collaborative project with continuous and systematic interaction between the authors. Over time, we have developed a bond...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-12

In 1821, James Madison predicted that, with the exhaustion of the country’s reservoir of open land, Americans would face the prospect of rising inequality, including “a dependence...

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1. The City

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pp. 13-52

During the winter of 1869, an article in the Chicago Daily Tribune found that “in our principal thoroughfares the richly-dressed lady of the avenue magnificently sweeps...

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2. The Internationale of the Citizen Workers: From Slavery to the Labor Question

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pp. 53-80

Reflecting on the imminent Fourth of July celebration in 1865, the Chicago Tribune felt that a bridge had been built between the two great revolutionary periods of American...

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3. The Eight-Hour Day and the Legitimacy of Wage Labor

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pp. 81-116

On a sunny Wednesday, May 1, 1867, over five thousand workers marched to the lakefront in Chicago to support the eight-hour working day recently written into Illinois law. The sidewalks were thronged with workingmen, who “loudly cheered” the procession...

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4. Chicago's Immigrant Working Class and the Rise of Urban Populism, 1867–73

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pp. 117-154

In January 1872—three months after the Great Fire—Anton Hesing, Chicago’s German political boss, organized a protest against the city government’s effort to ban new wooden housing in the city as a fire control measure. The protesters thought that...

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5. Class and Politics during the Depression of the 1870s

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pp. 155-193

The economic depression combined with Chicago’s notorious cold weather to make the winter of 1873–74 especially severe. On the afternoon of December 31, 1873, a crowd of about...

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6. Combat in the Streets: The Railroad Strike of 1877 and Its Consequences

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pp. 194-219

In the summer of 1877, the United States experienced its first national strike, an unorganized, spontaneous rebellion of working people in cities from Baltimore and Pittsburgh to St. Louis...

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7. Regime Change

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pp. 220-246

More than any single person or institution, Democratic Mayor Carter Harrison pacified class relations in Chicago, freeing the city’s capitalists to accumulate wealth without...

Notes

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pp. 247-294

Index

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pp. 295-310

About the Author, Further Reading, Production Notes, Back Cover

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pp. 311-311