Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-1

Half Title Page, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 2-7

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

This book owes much to my days in the graduate division of Religion at Emory University, and, in more ways than I know how to name, its ideas are a product of the teachers and colleagues I enjoyed there. among the latter, Matthew Flemming was especially influential. ...

read more

1. The Scandal of Having Something to Say

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-16

This book explores how scriptural language and sermonic language participate in God’s free act of self-communication. I begin with some theological reflections on the contemporary context that motivates this project. ...

read more

2. Hans Frei on How to Read during an Eclipse

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 17-48

Behind every christian sermon worthy of the name is a preacher reading the Bible.1 or, in the language of the previous chapter, the prospect of the christian preacher “having something to say” to the human situation from beyond the human situation turns on the promise of the Bible as a resource for mediating such a Word. ...

read more

3. Paul Ricoeur and the World of the Text

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 49-80

Paul Ricoeur’s philosophy of language and interpretation theory will be explored in depth. Though Ricoeur’s hermeneutical thought has been explicated in connection to both Barth and Frei,1 it has not been sufficiently appreciated in the field of homiletics.2 ...

read more

4. A Ricoeurian Revision of Postliberal Homiletics

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 81-120

Ricoeur’s hermeneutical project is able to redress a number of problems that surface when Frei’s approach is applied to preaching. Toward this end, Ricoeur’s hermeneutics must first be developed in relation to both biblical discourse generally and narrative in particular. ...

read more

5. Preaching as Threefold Mimesis

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 121-146

Ricoeur’s approach to interpretation supplies resources for a more compelling account of the text-to-sermon process than is currently available in the homiletical literature. in particular, his understanding of the hermeneutical encounter with narrative texts as threefold mimesis is enlightening at two distinct points in the text-to-sermon process. ...

Appendix: Pain Turned to Newness

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 147-152

Appendix: Lost

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 153-156

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 157-162

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 163-166