Cover

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pp. 1-4

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 5-6

Contents

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pp. 7-16

Illustrations

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pp. xvii-xviii

Acknowledgments

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pp. xix-xx

Editor's Note

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pp. xxi-xiii

Chronology

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pp. xxiv-xxix

Prologue

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pp. 2-4

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Chapter 1

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pp. 15-48

WHEN Washington accepted the command of the Virginia militia, which was enlisted in the service of King George to prosecute...

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Chapter 2

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pp. 49-90

GEORGE WASHINGTON assumed his command in the immediate aftermath of the Battle of Bunker's Hill. The first task to...

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Chapter 3

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pp. 91-170

WASHINGTON and his men nearly starved at Valley Forge in the winter of 1777- 78, yet they emerged from that trial...

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Chapter 4

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pp. 171-198

WASHINGTON had urged the notion of an American union, in the context of the Revolution, as early as 1775· The progress...

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Chapter 5

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pp. 199-224

VICTORY did not bring the end of Washington's troubles. The British remained in place on American soil for two years more...

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Chapter 6

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pp. 225-250

WASHINGTON's famous "Circular Letter" constitutes the centerpiece of his statesmanship, carrying directly to his countrymen...

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Chapter 7

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pp. 251-274

WASHINGTON'S transition from statesman-general to citizen-statesman occurred almost effortlessly. The year-and-a half...

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Chapter 8

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pp. 275-328

WASHINGTON returned to Mount Vernon, which was in considerable disrepair, to resume the domestic arts he had so long pined...

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Chapter 9

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pp. 329-404

WASHINGTON's replies to Bushrod Washington in 1786 distill much of his political judgment in the period of constitutional...

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Chapter 10

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pp. 405-438

In Washington's writings in this chapter he comments on the prospects for the new government in the aftermath of the ratification of the Constitution...

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Chapter 11

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pp. 439-528

TOO LONG and too radical, Washington's first draft of his first inaugural address was never delivered. Its pages scattered...

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Chapter 12

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pp. 529-562

WE principally behold Washington, in the following pages, describing the character of his country and administration in general correspondence, rather than in official acts....

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Chapter 13

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pp. 563-626

WASHINGTON'S administration of the government under the Constitution was not untroubled. During those eight years the founding itself was consummated, yet during...

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Chapter 14

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pp. 627-663

WASHINGTON confidently speaks of "the happy reward of our mutual cares, labors, and dangers" in his "Farewell Address...

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Epilogue

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pp. 664-680

WASHINGTON lived only three years beyond his resignation from the presidency. He returned once again to a Mount Vernon fallen to a point beyond which his labors could...

Index of Recipients

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pp. 681-682

Subject Index

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pp. 683-714