In this Book

Desert Visions and the Making of Phoenix, 1860-2009
summary
From the beginning, Phoenix sought to grow, and although growth has remained central to the city’s history, its importance, meaning, and value have changed substantially over the years. The initial vision of Phoenix as an American Eden gave way to the Cold War Era vision of a High Tech Suburbia, which in turn gave way to rising concerns in the late twentieth century about the environmental, social, and political costs of growth. To understand how such unusual growth occurred in such an improbable location, Philip VanderMeer explores five major themes: the natural environment, urban infrastructure, economic development, social and cultural values, and public leadership. Through investigating Phoenix’s struggle to become a major American metropolis, his study also offers a unique view of what it means to be a desert city.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright Page
  2. pp. i-iv
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-x
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  1. Tables
  2. p. xi
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  1. Figures
  2. p. xii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xv-xvii
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-7
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  1. Part I - The First Desert Vision: An American Eden
  2. pp. 9-10
  1. 1 Civilizing the Desert: The Initial Phase
  2. pp. 11-35
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  1. 2 Building The Modern City: Physical Form and Function
  2. pp. 37-56
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  1. 3 Shaping the Modern American City: Social Construction
  2. pp. 57-91
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  1. Part II - Creating and Pursuing a New Vision, 1940–60
  2. pp. 93-94
  1. 4 Creating a New Vision: The War and After
  2. pp. 95-123
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  1. 5 Building a New Politics
  2. pp. 125-151
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  1. 6 Growing the City: Economic, Cultural, and Spatial Expansion
  2. pp. 153-181
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  1. Part III - Elaborating and Modifying the High-Tech Suburban Vision
  2. pp. 183-186
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  1. 7 From Houses to Communities: Suburban Growth in the Postwar Metropolis, 1945–1980
  2. pp. 187-229
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  1. 8 Political Change and Changing Policies in the 1960s and 1970s
  2. pp. 231-263
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  1. 9 Changing the Urban Form: The Politics of Place and Space
  2. pp. 265-293
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  1. 10 An Uncertain Future: Looking for a New Vision
  2. pp. 295-359
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  1. Conclusion: Desert Vision, Desert City
  2. pp. 361-366
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 367-444
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 445-459
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