In this Book

Force:A Fundamental Concept of Aesthetic Anthropology
summary
This book reconceives modern aesthetics by reconstructing its genesis in the 18th century, between Baumgarten's Aesthetics and Kant's Critique of Judgment. Force demonstrates that aesthetics, and hence modern philosophy, began twice. On the one hand, Baumgarten's Aesthetics is organized around the new concept of the "subject": as a totality of faculties; an agent defined by capabilities; one who is able. Yet an aesthetics in the Baumgartian manner, as the theory of the sensible faculties of the subject, at once faces a different aesthetics: the aesthetics of force. The latter conceives the aesthetic not as sensible cognition but as a play of expression--propelled by a force that, rather than being exercised like a faculty, does not recognize or represent anything because it is obscure and unconscious: the force of what in humanity is distinct from the subject. The aesthetics of force is thus a thinking of the nature of man: of aesthetic nature as distinct from the culture acquired by practice. It founds an anthropology of difference: between force and faculty, human and subject.

Table of Contents

  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. 1-4
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-6
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Abbreviations
  2. pp. vii-viii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Preface
  2. pp. ix-xii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 1. Sensibility: The Indeterminacy of the Imagination
  2. pp. 1-12
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 2. Praxis: The Practice of the Subject
  2. pp. 13-29
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 3. Play: The Operation of Force
  2. pp. 31-47
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 4. Aestheticization: The Transformation of Praxis
  2. pp. 49-66
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 5. Aesthetics: Philosophy’s Contention
  2. pp. 67-80
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 6. Ethics: The Freedom of Self-Creation
  2. pp. 81-98
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Notes
  2. pp. 99-111
  3. restricted access Download |
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.