Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 1-6

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Figures and Plates

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xiv

This book is the product of talk as much as it is of reading, watching, and writing. I am grateful to my many mentors and friends whose generosity and wisdom in conversation has made the research and writing of this book so enjoyable. Some have played a...

Note on Transliterations

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pp. xv-16

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Introduction. Shoring These Ruins against My Fragments

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pp. 1-34

Ruins are everywhere twenty years after the civil war of 1975–90. Some are preserved as monuments with commemorative plaques. People eke out livings in others among the cracks and shell-pocks. Some are covered in giant colorful advertisements four stories...

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Chapter One. Absence at the Heart of Yearning: Civil War and Postwar Novels

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pp. 35-95

In the introduction, I historicized the rise of the Lebanese war novel as a response to the failure of realist commitment literature. I traced this aesthetic transition to a shift in the narrativization of civil war from cold-war to ethnic-sectarian paradigms. I argued...

Image Plates

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pp. 96-95

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Chapter Two. “Speak, Ruins!” The Work of Nostalgia in Feature Film

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pp. 96-143

Nostalgia and Lebanese film have gone together since 1929, when Jordano Pidutti depicted an emigrant’s homecoming in the first Lebanese film, Mughamarat Ilyas Mabruk (The Adventures of Elias Mabruk).1 Cinema was ideally suited for capturing nostalgic...

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Chapter Three. Elegiac Humanism and Popular Politics: The Independence Uprising of 2005

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pp. 144-176

In the first two chapters of this book, I argued that the aesthetic of elegiac humanism that emerged in the late 1970s grew from within a structure of feeling stretching back to the known roots of Arab societies. These culturally conditioned feelings are associated...

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Conclusion. “We’re All Hezbollah Now”

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pp. 177-183

Throughout this book, I have made the case for the existence of a minority aesthetic in wartime and postwar Lebanon, calling it “elegiac humanism” and arguing that it provides a cultural framework for an alternative to the long-term sectarian revanchism that...

Appendix. A Selected Bibliography of Lebanese War Novels

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pp. 185-187

Notes

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pp. 189-222

Works Cited

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pp. 223-238

Index

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pp. 239-247