Cover

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pp. 1-1

Series Page

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pp. 2-2

Title Page

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pp. 3-3

Copyright

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pp. 4-4

Contents

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pp. v-5

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Preface and Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

Sister in Sorrow: A Journey to the Life Histories of Female Holocaust Survivors from Hungary began as a PhD thesis that was written in the 1990s and devoted to the experiences and narratives of both male and female survivors living in Israel and in Hungary. At that time, the idea that Holocaust testimonies, as they were...

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1. Brainstorming about the Life Histories of Women Holocaust Survivors

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pp. 1-22

The beginning of this book is a name: Ilana, my Hebrew name, or Ilona, the Hungarian name of two of my female relatives, one on the side of each of my parents. Both women were murdered in the Holocaust. For some reason, my parents named my sister and two brothers after their own parents and other relatives...

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2. Mother-Daughter Discourse: A Literary-Psychoanalytical Analysis of Five Life Histories

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pp. 23-82

The five life histories to be analyzed in this chapter are unique in the importance they place on life after the Holocaust—that is, on the hardships encountered by these women survivors in rebuilding their lives in the void and emptiness left by the Holocaust. The post-Holocaust period in these narratives is fraught with struggles and di≈culties that are viewed by the narrators as being just as arduous and significant as their experiences during the Holocaust...

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3. The Holocaust Experience of Its Listeners and Readers: A Phenomenological-Hermeneutic Analysis of Ten Life Histories

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pp. 83-126

The life histories that are presented and analyzed in this chapter are divided into two major groups. One (including the life histories of Dora Ashkenazi, Rachel Markowitz, and Ruth Matias) presents a mosaic of languages and cultures, and the second (including the accounts of the Heiman and Bihari couples and those of Berta Wazner, Esther Israel, and Piri Meister) is characterized...

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4. A Journey without a Conclusion

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pp. 127-134

As mentioned in Lawrence Langer’s Holocaust Testimonies, cited in the introduction to this book, narratives about the Holocaust generate not one but many truths.1 Among them is, first and foremost, the truth of the narrators, which often includes their conflicting accounts or viewpoints about how and what to remember and tell. Then there is the truth—or truths—arising...

Appendix: The Life Histories

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pp. 135-222

Notes

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pp. 223-232

Bibliography

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pp. 233-250

Term Index

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pp. 251-264

Name Index

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pp. 265-266

Place Index

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pp. 267-269