Cover

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pp. 1-3

Title Page

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pp. 4-4

Copyright Page

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pp. 5-5

Dedication Page

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pp. 6-7

Table of Contents

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pp. 8-11

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Introduction

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pp. 1-12

Imagine for a moment that we found, in some dusty attic, the late, lost play Cardenio by William Shakespeare and John Fletcher, based on the unhinged lover-turned-wild-man...

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Chapter 1: Forcible Translation

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pp. 13-38

In the eventful century after humanist Antonio Nebrija’s Spanish Gramática (1492) famously identified language as the companion of empire, vernacular languages became...

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Chapter 2: Knights and Merchants

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pp. 39-54

The early years of James’s reign provided a bonanza of Spanish materials for English readers. The end of the protracted hostilities in 1604 and the mutual peace embassies from Spain to England...

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Chapter 3: Plotting Spaniards, Spanish Plots

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pp. 55-78

Even at the moments of England’s closest political rapprochement with Spain and greatest cultural fascination with its literature, taking from Spain was always fraught...

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Chapter 4: Cardenio Lost and Found

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pp. 79-97

With the 400th anniversary of Don Quijote in 2005 and of the 1612 Shelton translation in 2012, Shakespeare...

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Chapter 5: Cardenios for Our Time

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pp. 98-130

As the reception of Double Falshood both in the eighteenth century and in our own time demonstrates, the critical anxiety about finding the hand of “the Bard” in the play has largely...

Notes

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pp. 131-160

Bibliography

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pp. 161-174

Index

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pp. 175-184

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 185-186

I have been fortunate to have found a series of wonderful interlocutors in the study of Spain and England, from Roland Greene, Patricia Parker, and Stephen Orgel, who fostered my earliest...