Cover

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pp. 1-3

Title

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pp. 4-4

Copyright

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pp. 5-7

Contents

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pp. 8-9

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Foreword

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pp. ix-xvi

Proper study and appreciation of the life and art of Clementine Hunter may be likened to the experience of holding a kaleidoscope up to the light and watching its multiple surfaces...

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Preface

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pp. xvii-xxii

When one examines Clementine Hunter’s vast oeuvre, it becomes apparent that while she never learned the familiar language symbols one needs to write words or the syntactic...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-4

The first time I met Clementine Hunter was in the spring of 1966. Ora Williams, an English teacher at Northwestern State University in Natchitoches and the supervisor of my student...

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1. A Moment of Recognition: May 17, 1985

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pp. 5-11

Clementine Hunter sat quietly in the back of Prather Coliseum on the campus of Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, Louisiana. At ninety-eight years age...

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2. From the Cotton Fields to the Big House

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pp. 12-21

As Clementine Hunter’s significance as an American artist grew, those who valued her art realized the importance of documenting the artist’s life story. Mildred Hart Bailey...

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3. Memory and a Sense of Place

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pp. 22-32

To understand the complexity of Clementine Hunter and her art, one must understand her relationship to the land from which she came. She was very much an...

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4. The Remarkable and Enigmatic Mr. Mignon

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pp. 33-45

Clementine Hunter’s move to melrose plantation proved to be the most significant event in her life. Unquestionably, the second most important event occurred when...

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5. Mr. Pipes and the Artist

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pp. 46-56

During the decades of the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s Clementine Hunter was supported and encouraged not only by François Mignon but also by another admirer, James Pipes Register...

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6. Becoming an Artist

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pp. 57-67

Clementine Hunter was well past middle age when her work moved from outside to inside, from the cotton fields and pecan groves to the Melrose Big House. Cammie Henry...

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7. The African House Murals

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pp. 68-75

by the summer of 1955 Clementine Hunter had been painting for at least fifteen years. She had developed the major themes that would dominate her paintings in the years ahead...

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8. A Lifetime Told in Art

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pp. 76-96

Clementine Hunter left no correspondence, no diaries, not even a note on a scrap of paper from which one can learn firsthand about her life. Interviews by reporters and researchers...

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9. Friends, Supporters, and Patrons

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pp. 97-113

While it is clear that François Mignon and James Register were the driving force managing and promoting Clementine Hunter, they were not alone in their recognition of her art...

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10. New Year’s Day, 1988

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pp. 114-119

Clementine Hunter died at 2:10 in the afternoon on Saturday, January 1, 1988. She was unable to eat and suffering from dehydration on Wednesday, December 29, when her daughter...

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11. Fakes, Forgeries, and the FBI

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pp. 120-128

Joseph Barabe peered intently into the eyepiece of a powerful, enhanced microscope. Magnified several thousand times, he meticulously studied the canvas, the strokes, and the chemistry of one of Clementine Hunter’s paintings of African House....

Appendix: The Evolution of Hunter’s Signature

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pp. 129-132

Notes

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pp. 133-140

Bibliography

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pp. 141-144

Index

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pp. 145-152