Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. 2-7

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Introduction

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pp. ix-xii

David W. Johnson, S.J., who is being honored by this collection of essays, has a remarkable range of interests. Those who know him can attest to the breadth of his reading: from science fiction to mathematics to the complete works of Barry Gifford. In languages, ancient and modern, his studies have included Russian and Japanese, as well as several languages of the Near East. ...

Abbreviations

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pp. xiii-xviii

David W. Johnson: Publications

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pp. xix-xx

I. Language and Literature

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1. The Coptic Ecclesiastical History: A Survey

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pp. 3-24

Coptic studies are cultivated by a limited number of scholars, many of whom know each other personally through the activities of the International Association for Coptic Studies. Various members of the association inevitably choose a more restricted field of investigation, and I am privileged in this regard to share an interest ...

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2. Rhetorical Structure in Coptic Sermons

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pp. 25-48

Although a significant number of Coptic sermons1 have been published in the last fifty years, very little attention has been devoted to the literary and rhetorical analysis of this form of literature since the publications of C. D. G. Müller.2 It may therefore be useful to begin by summarizing the state of the question as Müller left it. ...

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3. Sarabaitae and Remnuoth: Coptic Considerations

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pp. 49-60

Jerome (Epist. 22.34)1 and Cassian (Conlat. 18.4,7)2 independently list three different classes of Egyptian monks. Each list includes two classes, which are noted with approval. Jerome names first the cenobites (coenobium), who, he says, are called sauhes in Coptic.3 The anchorites (anachoretae) are Jerome’s second class of monks. ...

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4. Reading and Rereading Shenoute’s I Am Amazed: More Information on Nestorius and Others

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pp. 61-71

The text of a discourse by Shenoute of Atripe first came to scholarly notice in the 1980s, through the work of Tito Orlandi. His 1982 article “A Catechesis Against Apocryphal Texts by Shenute and the Gnostic Texts of Nag Hammadi”1 called attention to a little-known text and emphasized the Gnostic references, an understandable approach at that time. ...

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5. Questions and Related Phenomena in Coptic and in General: Final Definitions Based on Boole’s Laws

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pp. 72-94

This essay is an attempt to apply George Boole’s ideas on the nature of thought to grammar in general and to Coptic and Egyptian grammar in specific. In presenting a line of argument, utmost parsimony is envisioned, in an effort to emulate that “character of steady growth which belongs to science” (Boole, Investigation [see note 1], 2). ...

II. Social Context

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6. Earliest Christianity in Egypt: Further Observations

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pp. 97-112

In September 1983 a conference was held in Claremont (with a day trip to Santa Barbara) devoted to the theme, “The Roots of Egyptian Christianity,” with an international array of scholars participating. That conference, organized by James E. Goehring and myself and sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities, ...

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7. Philo, Origen, and the Rabbis on Divine Speech and Interpretation

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pp. 113-129

One of the most important of hermeneutical consequents of Logos theology was a proclivity for allegory as a mode of interpretation.1 The concept of a Logos as both the site of absolute creativity as well as the revealer of absolute Truth, of Sophia, will promote allegory as a legitimate and choice mode of interpretation. ...

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8. Cannibalism and Other Family Woes in Letter 55 of Evagrius of Pontus

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pp. 130-139

Festschriften constitute, in effect, letters of congratulation in the form of short studies offered to an eminent scholar at the culmination of a career. It may be appropriate, then, to offer as a small part of this Festschrift for an esteemed colleague a study of a letter of Evagrius of Pontus (d. 399) which, small as it is, illuminates the general topic ...

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9. The Successors of Pachomius and the Nag Hammadi Codices: Exegetical Themes and Literary Structures

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pp. 140-157

I want here to offer reflections on some “post-Pachomian” texts that might clarify possible relations between Pachomius’s followers and the creators or collectors or depositors of the “Nag Hammadi Library.”1 That relations were possible has long been acknowledged because of the proximity of the Nag Hammadi site ...

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10. Keeping the Monastery Clean: A Cleansing Episode from an Excerpt on Abraham of Farshut and Shenoute’s Discourse on Purity

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pp. 158-175

An excerpt on the sixth-century Pachomian archimandrite Abraham of Farshut1 preserved in a fragmentary manuscript from the White Monastery in Upper Egypt records the cleansing of a meeting place in the Pachomian community’s central monastery of Pbow following the departure of representatives of the emperor Justinian I.2 ...

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11. Illuminating the Cult of Kothos: The Panegyric on Macarius and Local Religion in Fifth-Century Egypt

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pp. 176-188

The Panegyric on Macarius of Tkow, which David Johnson has bequeathed to generations of historians of late antiquity through his expert CSCO edition, is certainly as deceptive a document of early Christianity as it is rich in peculiar details. Consumed as it is with anti-Chalcedonian polemic and the promotion of an obscure Monophysite holy man, ...

Bibliography

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pp. 189-210

Contributors

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pp. 211-212

General Index

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pp. 213-224

Index to Scripture

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pp. 225-226

Production Notes, Back Cover

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pp. 248-249