Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-xii

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Introduction

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pp. xiii-xviii

The letters of St. Basil, three hundred and sixty-eight in number, which comprise the most vivid and most personal portion of his works, give us, perhaps, the clearest insight into the wealth of his rich and varied genius.1 They were written within the years from 357, ...

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1. To Eustathius, the Philosopher

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pp. 3-4

Though I had for some time been disheartened by the malice of what men call Fortune, which has always put some obstacle in the way of our meeting, you cheered and consoled me mightily by your letter. As it chanced, I was already pondering the question of whether or not ...

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2. Basil to Gregory

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pp. 5-11

I recognized your letter just as men recognize the children of friends from their unmistakable resemblance to their parents. For, you say that the environment is not important in implanting in your soul a desire to live with us until you learn something of our customs and our manner of life. ...

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3. To Candidianus

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pp. 12-13

When your letter came into my hands, it aroused a feeling worthy of your hearing. I was in awe of it, thinking it was bringing some official announcement; while I was breaking the seal, I dreaded to look at it as any Spartan prisoner ever dreaded to see the Laconian Dispatch.2 ...

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4. To Olympius

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pp. 13-14

What are you doing, 0 wondrous man,2 driving my loved Poverty, the guardian of philosophy, out of my solitude? You would likely have to flee prosecution for ejecting her, if she should perchance receive the gift of speech. She would probably say: 'I chose to dwell with this man, because now he praises Zeno, ...

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5. A Letter of Condolence to Nectarius

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pp. 14-17

On the third or fourth day after I had received the dazing report of your crushing misfortune, while I was still bewildered because of the meagerness of detail given by the messenger who brought the distressing news, and, moreover, while I was still skeptical of the current report ...

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6. A Letter of Condolence to the Wife of Nectarius

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pp. 17-19

I had thought to maintain silence toward your Modesty, 2 considering that, just as the most delicate of remedies causes pain to an inflamed eye, so also condolence offered in a moment of excessive pain, even though it brings much consolation, seems in some way to be distressing to a soul afflicted with deep anguish. ...

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7. To His Companion, Gregory

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p. 20

Even when I was writing to your Eloquence, I knew well that every theological expression is less than the thought in the mind of the speaker and less than the interpretation desired by him who seeks, because speech is in some way too weak to serve perfectly our thoughts.2 ...

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8. An Apology to the Caesareans for His Withdrawal, and a Defense of the Faith

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pp. 21-40

I have frequently wondered at your affection toward us, and your marks of deference to our insignificance, petty and weak as we are, and possessed, probably, of so few lovable qualities. For, you encourage us with your words, mentioning our friendship and our fatherland as though trying, ...

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9. To the Philosopher Maximus

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pp. 40-43

Words are truly the pictures of the soul. Therefore, we have come to know you through your letter, just as, according to the proverb, we know the lion by his claws.2 And we are delighted in the discovery that you are not negligent in regard to the principal and greatest of virtues—love both for God and for your neighbor. ...

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10. To a Widow

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p. 44

There is a certain method used for hunting doves, such as this. When the fowlers have caught a bird, they tame it so that it will eat in their presence. Then, rubbing its wings with perfume, they allow it to join the flock outside. The sweet odor of that perfume wins for the owner the rest of the wild birds, ...

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11. Without Address, through Friendship

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pp. 44-45

We spent the holy day, by the grace of God, with our children,2 who, because of their extraordinary love of God, really made it a perfect feast day with the Lord. Now we have sent them on in good health to your Nobility3 with a prayer to the loving God that they may be given an angel ...

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12. To Olympius

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p. 45

Formerly you wrote us, but briefly; now, not even a few words. Since your brevity keeps increasing with time, it is likely to become complete silence. Return, therefore, to your first practice; we shall no longer find fault with you for the laconic terseness of your letters. ...

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13. To Olympius

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p. 45

Just as everything else which is seasonal appears in its own proper time-flowers in spring, ears of corn in summer, and apples in autumn-so intellectual discussions are the fruit of winter.

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14. To Gregory, His Companion

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pp. 46-48

Although my brother Gregory wrote that for a long time he had been wanting to visit with us, and added that you also had the same desire, I am unable to remain here because, having been frequently deceived, I am reluctant to rely upon your coming, and also because I am drawn away by business. ...

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15. To Arcadius, Imperial Administrator

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pp. 48-49

The citizens of our capital conferred a greater favor than they received when they provided me with an opportunity of writing to your Honor.2 For truly, because of your usual innate gentleness toward all, the privilege they sought to obtain through a letter from us was theirs even before the letter was written. ...

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16. Against Eunomius, the Heretic

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pp. 49-50

He who says that it is possible to attain to a knowledge of things really existing has, no doubt, directed his process of thought by some method and orderly procedure having its inception in his actual knowledge of existing things, and, after he has trained himself by the comprehension ...

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17. To Origen

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pp. 50-51

Listening to you delights us, but reading your expositions gives us even more pleasure. And great is our gratitude to the good God, who did not permit the truth to be brought to naught because of its betrayal by would-be erudites, but, on the contrary, supplied through you a defense for the word of true religion. ...

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18. To Macarius and John

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pp. 51-52

The work of the farm does not surprise the farmer, nor the storm at sea astonish the sailor, nor the sweat of summer dismay the hireling; so, in truth, afflictions of the present life do not find unprepared those who choose to live holily. Each of these occupations is accompanied by its proper labor, ...

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19. To Gregory, a Companion

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p. 52

We have just received your letter; yours in the strict sense of the word, not so much in the distinctiveness of the handwriting as in the characteristic style of the letter itself. The words were few but thought-filled. We did not answer immediately, since we ourselves were away from home ...

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20. To Leontius, the Sophist

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pp. 52-54

Our letters to you are, it is true, infrequent, but not more so than yours to us, although people have been continually coming from your country to visit us. Now, if you were dispatching letters by all of these, one after another, we could easily imagine ourselves with you and enjoy you ...

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21. To Leontius, the Sophist

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pp. 54-55

The good Julian seems to be deriving some personal advantage from the general state of affairs. For, at present, when all the world is full of men demanding payment and bringing charges, he also is clamoring for payment and vehemently making accusations. Only, in his case, it is not arrears in taxes but in letters. ...

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22. Concerning the Perfection of the Monastic Life

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pp. 55-60

There are many things set forth in the divinely inspired Scriptures which must be observed by those who are earnestly endeavoring to please God. But at this time I wish to explain, necessarily briefly, as I understand them from the divinely inspired Scripture itself, only those points which have been questioned among you at present. ...

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23. Admonition to a Monk

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pp. 61-62

There has come to me a man who says he despises the vanity of this life, the joys of which he has observed to be ephemeral, passing quickly away and merely furnishing material for eternal fire. He wishes' to withdraw from a wretched and lamentable life, to forsake the pleasures of the flesh, ...

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24. To Athanasius, Father of Athanasius, Bishop of Ancyra

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pp. 62-64

I myself am convinced, nor do I think that your Excellency doubts it, that it is one of the most difficult, if not impossible, things, for the life of a man to be above slander. But, personally to provide no occasion to those keenly watching our actions or to those maliciously lying in wait for our slightest errors ...

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25. To Athanasius, Bishop of Ancyra

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pp. 64-66

Some coming to us from Ancyra—so many that it is not easy to enumerate them, but all agreeing in their accounts—reported to me that you, my dear Friend2 (how can I speak of it without hurting you), do not mention us in a very pleasant manner nor in accordance with your usual character. ...

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26. To Caesarius, Brother ot Gregory

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pp. 66-67

Thanks be to God, who in your person has manifested His wondrous power by saving you from such a terrible death, and preserving you both for your country and for us, your relatives. It remains for us, indeed, not to be ungrateful nor unworthy of so great a bounty. ...

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27. To Eusebius, Bishop of Samosata

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p. 68

When, by the grace of God and the aid of your prayers, I seemed to recover somewhat from my sickness and had gathered strength, the winter came, confining us indoors and compelling us at the same time to remain in our country. ...

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28. A Letter of Condolence to the Church of Neo-Caesarea

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pp. 68-73

Truly, that which has befallen you demanded our presence. that we might pay to the full with you, our closest friends, the honors due to a blessed man, and might share with you, at the sight of your greater sorrow, the dejection caused by your misfortune, and, also, that we might with you make necessary plans. ...

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29. A Letter of Condolence to the Church of Ancyra

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pp. 73-74

The distressing report of your sad misfortune shocked us for a long time into silence. But, since we have somewhat recovered from the speechlessness which we suffered as do men who have been struck deaf by a mighty burst of thunder, we cannot, in the midst of our mourning over the occurrence, refrain from sending you a letter. ...

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30. To Eusebius, Bishop of Samosata

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pp. 74-75

If I should enumerate, one after another, all the causes which have kept me at home until the present time, even though I was exceedingly eager to visit your Reverence, I would produce a story of interminable length. I omit mention of my continual illnesses, of the burden of the winter season, ...

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31. To Eusebius, Bishop of Samosata

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pp. 75-76

The famine has not yet released us from its grasp. Therefore, we must remain in the city both for the purpose of distributing aid2 and for showing compassion for those in affliction. For this reason, I am not able even now to share the journey with my most revered3 brother Hypatius, ...

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32. To the Master Sophronius

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pp. 76-78

Our brother Gregory,2 the bishop, dearly beloved of God,3 is sharing the benefit of these times. For he, also, in common with everyone else, suffers the buffetings of successive slanders showered upon him like unexpected blows. For, men who do not fear God and who are, perhaps, hard pressed ...

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33. To Aburgius

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p. 79

Who, indeed, knows as well as you how to honor an old friendship, to revere virtue, and to share the sufferings of those in distress? So, when troubles, unendurable in any event, but especially contrary to his character, overtook our brother Gregory,2 the bishop dearly beloved of God, ...

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34. To Eusebius, Bishop of Samosata

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pp. 79-81

How can we be silent in the present circumstances? Or, since we are not able to endure it patiently, how can we speak adequately of the existing conditions, so that our utterance will not be like a groaning but rather like a lamentation sufficiently evidencing the seriousness of the evil? ...

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35. Without an Address, in Behalf of Leontius

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p. 81

I have already written to you and shall often write even more concerning many persons on the ground that they are kinsmen of mine. For, the needy are always with us, nor are we able to deny them a favor. Besides, no one is dearer to me nor more able to give me relief by his prosperity than my most revered brother, Leontius. ...

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36. Without an Address, for Assistance

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p. 82

It has long been known to your Nobility, I think, that the presbyter of this place is my foster brother. What else, then, must I say to persuade your Excellency to look kindly upon him and to aid him in his affairs? Indeed, if you love me, as you assuredly do, then clearly ...

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37. Without an Address, for a Foster Brother

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pp. 82-83

I am already viewing with suspicion the number of my letters. Indeed, against my will and because I cannot endure the annoyance of people begging us, I am forced to cry out. Nevertheless, I write, since I can devise no other method of escape than to give letters each time to those asking for them. ...

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38. To His Brother Gregory, concerning the Difference between Substance and Person

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pp. 84-96

Since, at present, many persons treating of the doctrines relating to the mystery [of the Trinity] make no distinction between the general term of 'substance' and the word 'person,' they fall into the same presumption, thinking that it makes no difference whether they say 'substance' or 'person.' ...

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39. Julian to Basil

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pp. 96-98

'Thou earnest not as a messenger of war,' the proverb2 says, but I would add from the comedy,3 '0 messenger of golden words.' Come, then, prove this by your deeds, and hasten to us, for you will come as a friend to a friend. 4 ...

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40. Julian to Basil

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pp. 98-99

Although up to the present time we have shown the gentleness and kindliness natural from childhood, nevertheless we have gathered in all peoples under the sun as our subjects. For, lo! every nation of barbarians as far as the boundaries of the ocean has come, bringing gifts and placing them at our feet, as also have the Sagadares, ...

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41. Basil to Julian, in Answer

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pp. 100-101

Inconsequential are the vaunted deeds of your present high fortune. Miserable, also, is your boasted valor directed against us, yet not against us but against yourself. On my part, I shudder whenever I recall that you are invested with the purple and that your unworthy head is adorned with a crown; ...

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42. To Chilo, His Pupil

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pp. 102-111

I shall become responsible for your salvation, my true brother, if you willingly accept our counsels as to your line of conduct, especially in those matters wherein you yourself have urged us to advise you. For, many have dared to begin the solitary life, but few, perhaps, have labored to bring it to a worthy end. ...

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43. Admonition to the Young

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p. 111

You who live a faithful solitary life and practice piety, observe and learn the way of life, according to the Gospel—subjection of the body, lowliness of spirit, purity of thought, and control of anger. When pressed into service2 for the Lord's sake, do still more; ...

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44. To a Fallen Monk

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pp. 112-115

We do not say, 'Rejoice,' for there is no rejoicing for the wicked. Nay, disbelief still holds me fast, nor does my mind conceive so heinous an offense and so great a crime as you have committed, if the facts are really as they now appear to all. I wonder how such great wisdom was swallowed up; ...

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45. To a Fallen Monk

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pp. 115-118

A twofold fear has permeated the innermost depths of my mind because of the report concerning you. For, either a certain unsympathetic mood takes precedence, laying me open to a charge of harshness, or again, when I desire to pity and to be indulgent, your infirmities change my friendly attitude of mind. ...

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46. To a Fallen Virgin

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pp. 118-128

Now is the time to utter aloud those words of the Prophet who said: 'Who will give water to my head, and a fountain of tears to my eyes, and I will weep for the slain of the daughter of my people?'2 For, even if deep silence enfolds them and they lie dispossessed once ...

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47. To Gregory, His Companion

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pp. 128-130

'Who will give me wings like a dove?'2 Or how can my old age be renewed, so that I may be able to visit your Charity3 there to satisfy the longing which I have of seeing you and to tell you the sorrows of my soul, and thus through you to find some solace for my afflictions? ...

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48. To Eusebius, Bishop of Samosata

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pp. 130-131

It was with great difficulty that we were able to secure a carrier for this letter to your Reverence. For, the people of our country cringe so beneath the winter that they do not have the least courage to venture out of their houses. In fact, we have been covered with such a heavy snowfall ...

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49. To Arcadius, the Bishop

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pp. 131-132

I gave thanks to the holy God on reading your Reverence'2 letter; and I pray both that I may be worthy of the hope which you entertain of us, and that you may obtain the perfect reward for the honor which you bestow on us in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ. ...

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50. To Bishop Innocent

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pp. 132-133

Who is more fit than your Reverence in the Lord to inspire courage in the cowardly and arouse the sluggish. You have also manifested your excellence in all perfections, in being willing to descend to our Lowliness, proving yourself a true disciple of Him who said: ...

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51. To Bishop Bosporius

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pp. 133-135

How deeply, think you, was my soul pained on hearing of that slander poured out against me by some of those who do not fear the Judge who will 'destroy all that speak a lie'?2 As a result, your affectionate words kept me sleepless nearly the whole night, so firmly had grief fastened upon my inmost heart. ...

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52. To the Canonesses

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pp. 135-139

Our brother Bosporius,2 a bishop dearly beloved of God, by his more favorable report concerning your piety, gave us as much joy as the distressing rumor which resounded about our ears had previously pained us. For, he said, by the grace of God, alI those rumors spread abroad were fabrications ...

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53. To the Suffragan Bishops

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pp. 140-141

The disgracefulness of this hitherto-considered-incredible matter about which I am writing, and which consequently has become the subject of suspicion and common conversation, has filled my soul with grief. Therefore, let him who is conscious of guilt receive my words on this subject as a remedy; ...

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54. To the Suffragan Bishops

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pp. 142-144

It grieves me exceedingly that the canons of the Fathers have now fallen into disuse, and that all exact observance has been banished from the churches. I fear that, since this indifference is steadily growing, the affairs of the Church will sink gradually into utter ruin. ...

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55. To Paregorius, a Presbyter

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pp. 144-145

I read your letter with all patience, and I am amazed that, although you could have defended yourself before us briefly and easily by your actions, you prefer to persist in the situation causing the charges against you, and attempt to cure the incurable by long speeches. ...

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56. To Pergamius

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pp. 145-146

I am naturally forgetful, and the multiplicity of business affairs which has fallen to my lot is augmenting my natural weakness. Therefore, even though I do not remember that I have received a letter from your Nobility, I am persuaded that you sent us one, for surely you would not tell us a falsehood. ...

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57. To Meletius, Bishop of Antioch

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pp. 147-148

If the intensity of the joy with which you inspire us as often as you write were at all evident to your Reverence, I know that you would never have passed by any pretext offered you for writing. On the contrary, you would have contrived many excuses for sending us letters on every occasion, ...

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58. To Gregory, His Brother

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pp. 148-149

How can I argue with you by letter? How can I upbraid, as it deserves, your simplicity in all matters? Who, tell me, ever falls a third time into the same snares? Who falls a third time into the same trap? Even a brute beast would scarcely suffer that to happen to it. ...

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59. To Gregory, His Uncle

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pp. 150-152

'I have kept silence. And shall I always keep silence and be content'2 even longer to impose upon myself that most severe penalty of silence, neither myself writing nor hearing you salute me? For, since I have persisted in this grave decision until the present time, I think I may fittingly use the words of the Prophet: ...

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60. To Gregory, His Uncle

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pp. 153-154

I have always been glad to see my brother. In fact, why should I not, since he is my brother, and such a one? And at the present visit I have received him with the same affection, and have not in any way altered my love. God forbid that any such thing should happen as would make me forgetful ...

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61. To Athanasius, Bishop of Alexandria

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pp. 154-155

I have read the letter of your Holiness in which you expressed your sorrow at the actions of the disreputable governor of Libya, and we have truly mourned for our country2 because she is the mother and nurse of such evils. We have grieved, too, for Libya, our neighbor, ...

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62. A Letter of Consolation to the Church of Parnassus

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pp. 155-156

Following an old custom established by long observance and revealing to you the fruit of the Spirit, love in God, we are visiting your Reverence by letter, sharing with you both your grief at your bereavement and your solicitude for the affairs now at hand. ...

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63. To the Governor of Neo-Caesarea

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pp. 156-157

The wise man, e'en though he dwells in a distant land, though I may never behold him with my eyes, I account my friend,' says the tragic poet Euripides.2 If we say, therefore, even though we have never enjoyed the favor of personal acquaintance with your Excellency,3 ...

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64. To Hesychius

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p. 157

There are many things which even from the beginning have bound me to your Honor—our common love of letters, which is proclaimed in many places by those who have made proof of it, and our long-standing friendship with that admirable man, Terentius.2 ...

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65. To Atarbius

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pp. 158-159

And what end will there be to our silence, if I, on the one hand, should claim the privileges of age and wait for you to take the initiative in offering salutations, while your Charity, on the other, should wish to persist in your sinister decision of maintaining silence? ...

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66. To Athanasius, Bishop of Alexandria

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pp. 159-162

I think that the present order or, rather, to speak more truly, disorder of the churches, grieves no one else so much as your Honor. Indeed, in comparing the present with the past you can observe how utterly different from the former the existing conditions have become. ...

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67. To Athanasius, Bishop of Alexandria

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pp. 162-163

In my earlier letter to your Honor it seemed sufficient to me to declare this only—that all those comprising the holy Church at Antioch, who are strong in their faith, should be brought into agreement and unity. My purpose was to make clear that the many sections which have now been formed ...

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68. To Metetius, Bishop of Antioch

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pp. 163-164

Hitherto, we wished to keep the most pious2 brother Dorotheus,3 our fellow deacon, with us, so that at the end of our negotiations we might send him back to acquaint your Honor with the details of what has taken place. But, since we had long delayed, postponing matters from day to day, ...

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69. To Athanasius, Bishop of Alexandria

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pp. 164-168

The opinion which we have had for a long time of your Honor is always being confirmed as time advances; rather, it is even strengthened by the accumulation of successive incidents. Although it is quite enough for most men to watch over their own responsibilities, this does not suffice for you. ...

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70. Without Address, concerning a Synod

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pp. 168-170

To renew bonds characteristic of the early love and again to restore to vigor the peace of the Fathers, the heavenly and saving gift of Christ, which has been dimmed by time, is for us both essential and advantageous, and it will be, I well know, a pleasure to your Christ-loving spirit. ...

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71. Basil to Gregory

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pp. 170-173

I received the letter from your Reverence through the most revered brother Helenius;2 and what you intimated to us he in person clearly explained. As to how we were affected on hearing it, you certainly can have no possible doubt. But, since we have decided to consider our love for you superior to every grievance, ...

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72. To Hesychius

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pp. 173-174

I know both your love for us and your zeal for good. Therefore, since I must appease my most beloved2 son, Callisthenes,3 I thought that I would more easily accomplish my earnest desire if you would share my solicitude. The man has been vexed at the most eloquent4 Eustochius; and his vexation is just. ...

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73. To Callisthenes

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pp. 174-176

I gave thanks to God on reading the letter of your Nobility: first, because I received a greeting from a man who chose to honor us, for, truly, we value most highly association with eminent men; secondly, because I had the pleasure of being kindly remembered. The sign of remembrance was the letter. ...

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74. To Martinianus

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pp. 176-180

How much, think you, would I esteem the opportunity of our some time meeting and conversing together at greater length, so that I may enjoy all your splendid qualities? For, if it is important as an evidence of culture 'to have seen the cities of men and to have learned their minds,'2 ...

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75. To Aburgius

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pp. 181-182

Although there are many qualities which make your character superior to that of others, nothing is so characteristically yours as zeal for your country. Moreover, because you make just returns to that country from which you are sprung, you have become so great that your fame is known throughout the whole world. ...

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76. To the Master Sophronius

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pp. 182-183

Truly, the magnitude of the misfortunes which have overtaken our country was impelling me to go to court and describe not only to your Excellency but also to all others who possess the greatest influence in civil affairs the despondency which has overspread our city. But, since my physical condition and the care of the churches hold me back, ...

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77. Without Address, concerning Therasius

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p. 183

This one advantage we have enjoyed from the administration of the great Therasius—the continuous visits of your Eloquence to us. But, since we have been deprived of our ruler, we have likewise suffered the loss of this advantage. Yet, since favors once bestowed upon us by God remain steadfastly with us ...

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78. Without Address, in Behalf of Elpidius

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p. 184

Your kindly regard for our most revered companion Elpidius has not escaped our notice-how, with your customary sagacity, you gave the prefect an opportunity to show his benevolence. Therefore, through this letter we now urge you to make this favor perfect, reminding the prefect personally to put in charge of our country ...

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79. To Eustathius, Bishop of Sebaste

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pp. 184-185

Even before I received your letter, I was aware of the distress which you feel for every soul and, especially, for our Lowliness, because I have been thrown into this conflict. And when I had received the letter from the most revered Eleusinius,2 and had actually seen him present, ...

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80. To Athanasius, Bishop of Alexandria

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pp. 185-186

The more the disorders of the Church increase, the more do we tum toward your Perfection, believing that the one consolation left to us in our dangers lies in your leadership. You, indeed, have saved us from this terrible storm by the power of your prayers and by your knowledge of how to give the best suggestions in our troubles. ...

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81. To Bishop Innocent

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pp. 186-188

As I was delighted at receiving your Charity's letter, so in the same measure was I grieved because you have placed upon us a burden of responsibilities which exceeds our strength. For, how shall we be able, from so great a distance, to be in charge of such an important administration? ...

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82. To Athanasius, Bishop of Alexandria

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pp. 188-189

When we look into our affairs and perceive the difficulties by which every good action is restrained as if fettered by some chain, we fall into an absolute despair concerning ourselves. But, when again we look to your Grace and consider that our Lord has preserved you as the physician of the maladies in the churches, ...

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83. To an Assessor

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pp. 189-190

My acquaintance and personal contact with your Nobility has been exceedingly brief, but my knowledge of you by repute, through which we are associated with many distinguished men, is neither slight nor unworthy of consideration. Now, whether you also have heard any chance mention of us, ...

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84. To an Official

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pp. 191-193

What I am about to write is almost incredible, but for the sake of truth it shall be written. And this it is—that, although I had every desire to converse with your Honor as frequently as possible, when I found the occasion for this letter I did not rush eagerly to avail myself of the unexpected opportunity, but hesitated and shrank back. ...

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85. Concerning the Fact That It Is Unnecessary to Take an Oath

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pp. 193-194

We do not cease protesting in every synod and urging in private conferences this matter-that, in the case of public taxes, collectors must not exact oaths of farmers. My last resort is to protest solemnly before God and man by letter concerning this same subject, that it is your duty to cease bringing death upon the souls of men, ...

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86. To an Official

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pp. 194-195

I know that the greatest and principal care of your Honor is to comply in every way with the demands of justice, and the second, to benefit your friends and to exert yourself for those who have fled to your Lordship's protection. In this, therefore, we are in complete agreement on the present occasion. ...

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87. Without Address, concerning the Same Subject

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p. 195

I am astonished that, when you were acting as mediator, so much wrong was perpetrated against our fellow presbyter2 that he was despoiled of the only means of livelihood that he possessed. And the most terrible part of it is that they who dared to do this laid the responsibility for what they had done upon you, ...

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88. Without Address, for a Tax-Collector

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p. 196

Your Honor, more than all others, knows the difficulty of collecting gold furnished by contribution.2 Moreover, we have no better witness of our poverty than you, who in your remarkable kindness have both sympathized with us and up to the present shown all possible indulgence, ...

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89. To Meletius, Bishop of Antioch

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pp. 197-198

The good God, in providing us with occasions for friendly greetings to your Honor, soothes the intensity of our longing. He Himself is witness of the desire which we have to see you personally and to en joy your excellent and soul-profiting instruction. ...

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90. To the Most Holy Brothers and Bishops of the West

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pp. 198-200

The good God, who always joins consolations to afflictions, has even now in the midst of our many distresses let us find some degree of comfort from the letters which our most honorable father, Bishop Athanasius, received from your Rectitude and which he sent on to us. ...

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91. To Vaterian, Bishop of the Illyrians

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pp. 201-202

Thanks be to the Lord who permitted us to see in your Purity2 the fruit of pristine3 love. Although separated from us in the flesh by such a great distance, you have united yourself with us by letters, and by embracing us with your spiritual and holy love you have engendered in our souls an unspeakably great affection. ...

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92. To the Bishops of Italy and Gaul

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pp. 202-207

Even a groan drawn forth repeatedly from the depth of the heart brings some relief to distressed souls, and perhaps, also, a tear trickling down has dispelled the greater part of an affliction. However, the telling of our sufferings to your Charity does not offer us a relief only as a sigh or a tear do, ...

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93. To the Patrician Caesaria, about Communion

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pp. 208-209

Now, to receive Communion daily, thus to partake of the holy Body and Blood of Christ, is an excellent and advantageous practice; for Christ Himself says clearly: 'He who eats my flesh and drinks my blood has life evetlasting.'2 Who doubts that to share continually in the life is nothing else than to have a manifold life? ...

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94. To Elias, Governor of the Province

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pp. 209-211

I have been especially eager to approach your Honor myself, lest, because of my failure to appear, I should have less advantage than they who are slandering me. But, since the infirmity of my body has prevented me, afflicting me much more severely than usual, I have, of necessity, resorted to writing. ...

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95. To Eusebius, Bishop of Samosata

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pp. 212-213

Although I had long since written to your Reverence about other matters, and especially concerning our meeting with each other, I was utterly disappointed in my expectation, since the letter did not reach your Honor's hands. The blessed deacon, Theophrastus,2 who had taken the letter at a time when we were obliged ...

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96. To the Master Sophronius

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pp. 213-214

Who is as devoted to his city, honoring even as he does his parents the land which bore and nurtured him, as you yourself are, you who pray for blessings for the whole city in general and for each person individually, and not only pray, but also confirm your prayers through your personal efforts? ...

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97. To the Senate of Tyana

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pp. 214-216

The Lord who reveals the depths and makes manifest the counsels of hearts has also given to the lowly comprehension of artifices difficult, as some think, to understand. Therefore, nothing has escaped us; nor is anything which has been done still hidden. ...

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98. To Eusebius, Bishop of Samosata

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pp. 216-218

Although I was exceedingly eager to go to Nicopolis, after receiving the letter from your Holiness containing your refusal to go, I gave up my desire, at the same time recalling all my infinnities. Moreover, I realized the perfunctory manner of those inviting me, giving us a cursory invitation ...

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99. To Count Terentius

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pp. 218-223

Although I had felt the greatest eagerness to obey, at least in part, both the imperial command and your Honor's friendly letter, whose every word and every opinion, I felt confident, was laden with a right motive and a noble intention, I was not allowed to direct my zeal to the work. ...

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100. To Eusebius, Bishop of Samosata

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pp. 223-224

In the neighboring country of Armenia I beheld the letter of your Charity as men at sea would descry a beacon shining afar off on the waters, especially if the sea should happen to be wildly agitated by the winds. For, though, indeed, a letter of your Dignity is naturally pleasing and affords much comfort, ...

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10 1. A Letter of Consolation

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pp. 224-226

That this, our first letter to you, should have a more cheerful subject is a matter worthy of prayer. For, in this way, everything would have been according to our desire, because we wish that the whole life of all those who choose to live in piety should proceed prosperously toward a good end. ...

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102. To the Citizens of Satata

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pp. 226-227

Constrained by your own appeals and those of the whole people, I took upon myself the care of your church and I promised you before God to leave undone nothing that should come within my power. Therefore, as it is written, I was compelled to touch, as it were, the apple of my eye.2 ...

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103. To the People of Satala

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p. 227

The Lord has answered the prayers of His people, and through our Lowliness has given to them a shepherd worthy of the name, and not one who makes traffic of the title as many do. He is a man capable of pleasing you exceedingly in the name of the Lord who has filled him with His spiritual gifts, ...

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104. To the Prefect Modestus

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pp. 228-229

The very act of writing to so great a man, even if no other pretext were added, is to be esteemed a special honor in the eyes of the discerning, because association with men who preeminently surpass all others confers the highest distinction on those deemed worthy of it. ...

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105. To the Deaconesses, the Daughters of Count Terentius

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pp. 229-230

I expected, in truth, to meet your Modesties when I stopped at Samosata; when I failed to do so, I did not bear the disappointment easily, wondering when it would be either possible for me to approach your neighborhood again or pleasing to you to visit our country. ...

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106. To a Soldie

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p. 231

Although we must thank the Lord for many things of which he has considered us worthy in our travels, we judge that the acquaintance with your Honor which was granted to us by our good Master is our greatest blessing. For, we have come to know a man who makes clear ...

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107. To the Widow Julitta

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pp. 231-232

I was exceedingly distressed on reading in the letter from your Nobility that the same difficulties again beset you. What really should be done in regard to men who show such an unstable disposition, saying at one time one thing and at another another, ...

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108. To the Guardian of the Heirs of Julitta

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pp. 232-233

I was amazed when I heard that, forgetful of your former kind promises, so becoming to your Liberality,2 you were now bringing a most severe and rigid claim against this sister of ours. What I should infer from the reports I do not know. ...

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109. To Count Helladius

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pp. 233-234

I apologize exceedingly for being troublesome to your Excellency, lest I should seem to make use beyond measure of your friendship because of your great authority. Nevertheless, I am not permitted by the stress of circumstances to be silent. Therefore, when I saw this sister, a relative of ours, ...

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110. To the Prefect Modestus

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pp. 234-235

In the same measure as you have granted us honor and freedom of speech, being content in the gentleness of your disposition to descend to our level, in that measure and still more do we pray that our good Master will bestow on you an increase of dignity during your whole life. ...

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111. To the Prefect Modestus

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pp. 235-236

I would not have had the courage in other circumstances to trouble your Excellency, since I know how to estimate myself and how to recognize the powers of others. But, when I saw this man, a friend of mine, acutely disturbed because he had been summoned, I dared to give him this letter, ...

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112. To the Leader Andronicus

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pp. 236-239

If I had such health as to be able easily to endure journeys and to bear the hardships of winter, I would not be writing. On the contrary, for two reasons I should be going in person to visit your Magnanimity. The first is that I might pay the long-standing debt of my promise ...

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113. To the Presbyters at Tarsus

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pp. 239-240

On meeting this man, I felt great gratitude toward the holy God, because by the presence of such a one He gave me comfort from my many afflictions, and through him clearly showed your love. From the principles of this one man I have learned, I might say, the zeal which all of you have for the truth. ...

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114. To Cyriacus and His Followers in Tarsus

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pp. 241-242

Why should we proclaim among men who are sons of peace how great is the blessing of peace? Since, therefore, this blessing, great and wondrous and eagerly desired by all those who love the Lord, now runs the risk of being reduced to a bare name, 'because iniquity has abounded, ...

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115. To the Heretic Simplicia

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pp. 242-244

Ill-advisedly do men heap abominations upon their betters and indulge their inferiors. Therefore, I myself now restrain my tongue, stifling by silence any rebuke for the insolence directed against me. I shall wait for the Judge above who knows how to finally avenge every evil. ...

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116. To Firminus

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pp. 244-245

Your letters are both rare and brief, either because of your reluctance to write, or for some other reasons—because you are planning to escape the satiety arising from voluminous correspondence, or even because you are accustoming yourself to brevity in speech. For us, certainly, they are not at all sufficient. ...

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117. Without Address, on the Practice of Asceticism

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pp. 245-246

I own that I am already indebted to your Honor; besides, this present solicitude in which we are involved necessarily makes us dependent on assistance in such troubles, even if those advising are chance persons, to say nothing of you, who are joined to us by many other lawful claims. ...

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118. To Jovinus, Bishop of Perrha

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p. 247

I hold you a debtor of a goodly debt. For, I made you a loan of love which I should receive again with interest, since even our Lord does not reject such a form of interest. Therefore, pay it, my dear Friend, by coming to visit our country. Now, that, certainly, is the capital. ...

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119. To Eustathius, Bishop of Sebaste

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pp. 247-249

Through my most revered and most pious brother Peter2 I salute your Charity, urging you now, as on every other occasion, to pray for me that, turning from these detestable and harmful habits of mine, I may, at length become worthy of the name of Christ. ...

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120. To Metetius, Bishop of Antioch

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pp. 249-250

I received a letter from Bishop Eusebius, dearly beloved of God, enjoining us to write again to the Western bishops concerning certain ecclesiastical affairs, and he wanted us to write the letter to be signed by all who are in communion. But, since I did not see how I could write about the matters which he commanded, ...

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121. To Theodotus, Bishop of Nicopolis

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p. 251

The winter is bitter and prolonged, so that we do not readily have the consolation of letters. For this reason, I realize, I have seldom written to your Reverence or received letters from you. But since the most beloved brother Sanctissimus, our fellow presbyter, has undertaken a journey to you, ...

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122. To Poemenius, Bishop of Salala

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pp. 252-253

No doubt, you asked the Armenians for a letter when they returned through your city, and you learned my reason for not giving them one. Now, if they spoke with a love of the truth, you pardoned us at once; but, in case they concealed it, which I do not think probable, at least hear it from us. ...

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123. To the Monk Urbicius

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p. 253

You were going to visit us (and the blessing was near at hand) to refresh us at least with the tip of your finger when we were burning up in the midst of our trials. What then? Our sins stood in the way and prevented your setting out, that we might suffer without relief. ...

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124. To Theodorus

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p. 254

Some say that, if those held captive by the passion of love are drawn away from those loved by some unusually urgent necessity, whenever they look at a likeness of the beloved one they relieve the vehemence of the passion through the pleasure derived from the sight. ...

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125. A Transcript of Faith Dictated by the Most Holy Basil, Which Eustathius, Bishop of Sebaste, Signed

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pp. 255-260

Those who have either previously accepted another profession of faith and wish to transfer to unity with the orthodox, or even those who now for the first time wish to be instructed in the doctrine of truth, must be taught the Creed written by the blessed Fathers in the synod assembled formerly at Nicaea. ...

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126. To Atarbius

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pp. 261-262

We came to Nicopolis in the hope of correcting the disorders which had been stirred up and of applying a possible remedy to what had been done irregularly and contrary to ecclesiastical law. And we were exceedingly disappointed when we did not find your Excellency on our arrival, ...

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127. To Eusebius, Bishop of Samosata

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pp. 262-263

Our loving God, who adds consolations commensurate with our afflictions and comforts the downcast that they may not be overwhelmed unawares by their excessive grief, has afforded us a consolation equal to the disorders which assailed us at Nicopolis. ...

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128. To Eusebius, Bishop of Samosata

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pp. 263-265

I have not yet been able worthily to give practical proof of my zeal for reconciling the churches of the Lord. But I protest that I have in my heart so great a desire that I would even gladly deliver up my own life to extinguish the flame of hatred kindled by the Evil One. ...

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129. To Meletius, Bishop of Antioch

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pp. 266-268

I knew that the present charge brought against Apollinaris,2 who is so prone to say anything, would astonish the ears of your Perfection. In fact, I myself, until now, was not conscious that he had been accused. At present, however, the citizens of Sebasteia, after making investigations in some place or other, ...

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130. To Theodotus, Bishop of Nicopolis

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pp. 269-271

Deservedly and fittingly have you reproached us, our truly most honorable and beloved brother, because from the time that we departed from your Reverence carrying those propositions concerning the faith to Eustathius,2 we have let you know nothing either little or great about his affairs. ...

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131. To Olympius

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pp. 271-273

Truly, hearing of unexpected events is enough to make the two ears of a man ring. And this has now happened to me. For, although the news of those writings being circulated against us fell on my ears already inured to it, because I myself had formerly received the letter, ...

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132. To Abramius, Bishop of Batnae

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pp. 273-274

Since late autumn I have not known where your Reverence was living. In fact, I was getting varied reports, since some were announcing that your Reverence was tarrying in Samosata, and others in the country; still others were affirmingthat they had seen you around Batnae itself. ...

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133. To Peter, Bishop of Alexandria

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p. 274

Eyes are the promoters of sensuous friendship, and the intimacy engendered through a long stretch of time strengthens it. But, the gift of the Spirit brings about true love, joining together things separated by long distances and making known the beloved ones to each other not through physical characteristics ...

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134. To the Presbyter Paeonius

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p. 275

You can undoubtedly imagine from what you wrote how much your letter delighted us, so clearly apparent from the contents was the purity of heart from which those words came forth. For, as the stream reveals its own source, so the nature of the speech reveals the character of the heart which has brought it forth. ...

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135. To Diodorus, Presbyter of Antioch

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pp. 276-278

I have read the books sent by your Honor. And I have really enjoyed the second one very much, not only because of its brevity, as would one who is lazily disposed toward everything and at present without health, but because it is at one and the same time close-packed with ideas ...

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136. To Eusebius, Bishop of Samosata

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pp. 278-279

In what condition the excellent Isaac2 found us, he, better than I, will describe to you in person, even though he does not have a tongue able to report in tragic manner the excesiveness of my sufferings; such was the gravity of my illness. But, in all probability, this is known to everyone who is acquainted with me ever so little. ...

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137. To Antipater

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pp. 280-281

At present, I seem to be especially sensible of the loss which I suffer by my illness, when during the administration of our country by such a great man I myself am compelled to be absent because of the care I must give my body. For a whole month already I have been taking the treatments of the natural hot springs ...

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138. To Eusebius, Bishop of Samosata

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pp. 281-283

How do you think I felt when I received the letter from your Reverence? Considering the spirit of your message, I immediately wanted to fly straight to Syria, but, looking at the weakness of my body, which fettered me, I perceived that I was incapable not only of flying but even of turning over in bed. ...

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139. To the Alexandrians

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pp. 284-286

The report of the persecutions which have been taking place throughout Alexandria and the rest of Egypt reached me long ago, and it has deeply affected my soul, as was to be expected. For, we thought of the artifice of the Devil's warfare, who, when he saw that by the persecutions of our enemies the Church ...

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140. To the Church at Antioch

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pp. 286-289

'Who will give me wings like a dove? And I will fly' to you 'and be at rest'2 from my longing desire for a conference with your Charity. At present, however, I am in want not only of wings, but of a body itself, since mine has for some time past been laboring under a long-continued weakness, ...

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141. To Eusebius, Bishop of Samosata

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pp. 289-291

I have already received two letters from your inspired and most perfect Wisdom. One of them vividly described to us how we had been expected by the people under the jurisdiction of your Holiness, and how much grief we had caused by being absent from the most holy synod. ...

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142. To the Accountant of the Prefects

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pp. 291-292

At the synod of the blessed martyr Eupsychius2 I brought together all our brothers, the suffragan bishops,3 to make them known to your Honor. But, since you were absent, they must be introduced to your Perfection by letter. I would like you, therefore, to know this brother, who is worthy of being trusted by your Wisdom ...

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143. To the Second Accountant

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pp. 292-293

If it had been possible for me to visit your Honor, I would certainly have appealed in person for what I wanted, and I would have taken my stand as defender of the oppressed. But, since weakness of body and business affairs hold me back, I am recommending to you, in my place, this brother, ...

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144. To the Prefects' Administrator

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p. 293

Surely you know this man through your interview in the city. Nevertheless, I am presenting and recommending him to you also by letter, because, in view of his ability to suggest intelligently and prudently what should be done, he will be useful to you for many of the works ...

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145. To Eusebius, Bishop of Samosata

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pp. 293-294

I know the countless labors which you have endured in defense of the churches of God, and I am not ignorant of the numerous occupations in which you are engaged, since you do not carryon your administration carelessly but according to the will of God. ...

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146. To Antiochus

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pp. 294-295

I am not able to charge you with idleness because you were silent when an opportunity of writing a letter offered itself. For, the salutation which you sent me by your honored hand I prize more highly than many letters. Therefore, in return, I greet you and I urge you to give earnest care to the safety of your soul, ...

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147. To Aburgius

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pp. 295-296

Formerly, I used to think that the tales of Homer were a fable whenever I read the second part of the poem in which he narrates the sufferings of Odysseus. But, the sudden disaster befalling Maximus, a most excellent man in all respects, has taught us to consider as entirely probable those things until now regarded as fabulous and incredible. ...

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148. To Trajan

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pp. 296-297

It brings much consolation to the afflicted even to be able to lament their misfortunes bitterly, and, especially, when they find men who are able, because of the nobility of their character, to sympathize with them in their grievances. Now, the most revered brother Maximus, he who ruled our country, ...

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149. To Trajan

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pp. 297-298

You yourself have seen with your own eyes the misery of the formerly renowned but now most pitiable Maximus, who was governor of our country. Would that he had not been! For, I think that the government of the peoples will be shunned by many, if governorships are likely to come to such an end. ...

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150. To Amphilochius, in the Name of Heracleidas

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pp. 298-302

I recall the conversations which we once had with one another, and I have not forgotten either what I myself said nor what I heard from your Nobility. And, now, public life does not hold me back. Although I am the same in heart and have not yet put off the old man, except, ...

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151. To Eustathius, the Physician

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pp. 302-303

If there is any benefit from our letters, do not for any length of time cease writing to us and rousing us to write, for we ourselves are certainly made happier by reading the letters of intelligent men who love the Lord. And, whether you yourself really find something deserving of esteem ...

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152. To Victor, a Commander

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p. 304

If I should not write to some other person, I would, perhaps, justly incur the charge of negligence or forgetfulness. But, how is it possible to forget you, whose name is spoken among all men? And, how possible to neglect you, who have excelled almost all on earth in the loftiness of your honors? ...

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153. To Victor, the Ex-Consul

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pp. 304-305

As often as we chance to read the letters from your Modesty, we return thanks to God because you continue to be mindful of us, and do not because of any slander lessen the love which formerly, either by a wise judgment or a kindly practice, you consented to entertain for us. ...

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154. To Ascholius, Bishop of Thessalonica

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pp. 305-306

You have acted rightly and according to the law of spiritual charity in having begun the correspondence between us and stirred us to a like zeal by your good example. For, the friendship of the world needs the eyes and a personal meeting to initiate an acquaintance therefrom. ...

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155. Without Address, in the Case of a Trainer

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pp. 307-308

Against the many charges which were written in the first and only letter that your Nobility deigned to send us, I am at a loss as to how I should defend myself, not because of the want of a just reason, but because from among a great number of accusations the choice of the more relevant is a difficult matter, ...

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156. To Euagrius, a Presbyter

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pp. 308-311

So far was I from being displeased at the length of your message that the letter, because of the pleasure I derived from reading it, even seemed to me to be short. For, what is more pleasing to hear than the name of peace? Or what is more befitting the sacred office and more gratifying to the Lord than planning for such things? ...

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157. To Antiochus

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p. 311

You can imagine how disappointed I was at having failed to meet you during the summer. Even our meeting of other years was not such as to completely satisfy us. However, to see, at least in a dream, the objects of their desire brings some comfort to lovers. ...

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158. To Antiochus

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pp. 311-312

Since my sins stand against me so that I have not been able to accomplish the desire which I have long had of meeting you, I am at least consoling myself for the failure by means of letters. And we urge you not to cease remembering us in your prayers, in order that, if we live, ...

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159. To Eupaterius and His Daughter

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pp. 312-314

How much pleasure the letter of your Modesty afforded me you surely can imagine from the very contents. For, to a man who makes it his prayer that he may always associate with those who fear God and receive some advantage from them, what could be sweeter than such a letter through which knowledge of God is sought? ...

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160. To Diodorus

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pp. 314-319

A letter has reached us which bears the name of Diodorus, but which seems in all that follows to belong to anyone else rather than to Diodorus. In fact, it appears to me that some clever fellow, masquerading in your person, wished in this way to make himself seem trustworthy to his hearers. ...

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161. To Amphilochius, on His Consecration as Bishop

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pp. 319-321

Blessed be God, who chooses in each generation those pleasing to Him, making known His chosen vessels2 and using them for the ministry of the saints. He even now has ensnared you with the inescapable nets of His grace, when you were fleeing, as you say, not us, but the summons expected through us; ...

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162. To Eusebius, Bishop of Samosata

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pp. 321-322

The following reflection seems to me both to cause hesitation in writing and to indicate its very necessity. For, when I contemplate my obligation of remaining at home and at the same time take into account the benefit of a meeting, I am inclined to despise letters exceedingly, ...

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163. To Count Jovinus

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pp. 322-323

I saw your soul in your letter. For, truly, no painter can so accurately portray the lineaments of a body as speech can image the secrets of the soul. In fact, the words of your letter aptly represented to us the stability of your character, the genuineness of your worth, and the purity of your mind in all respects; ...

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164. To Ascholius, Bishop of Thessalonica

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pp. 323-326

The greatness of the joy with which the letter of your Holiness filled us we cannot easily describe, for speech is but a weak tool for vivid portrayal, but you yourself ought to infer it, basing your judgment on the beauty of what you have written. For, what did your letter not contain? ...

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165. To Ascholius, Bishop of Thessalonica

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pp. 326-327

The holy God has fulfilled our long-enduring prayer, having deemed us worthy to receive a letter from your true Reverence. Now, the greatest privilege and one deserving of the highest esteem is to see you personally and to be seen by you, and in ourselves to en joy the graces of the Spirit in you. ...

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166. To Eusebius, Bishop of Samosata

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pp. 327-328

Although our most revered brother, Eupraxius,2 is in every way dear to us and is among the truest of our friends, he has seemed dearer and truer because of his affection for you. Even now he has hastened to your Reverence like a hart (to use the words of David3) which quenches its great ...

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167. To Eusebius, Bishop of Samosata

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p. 329

You gladden us by writing as well as by being mindful of us, and, even more than this, by blessing us in your letters. But, if we had been deserving of your sufferings and of your combat for Christ, we would also have been considered worthy to visit you, to embrace your Reverence, ...

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168. To Antiochus the Presbyter, a Nephew of Eusebius, Who Was Living with His Uncle in Exile

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pp. 329-330

As much as I grieve that the Church has been deprived of so great a shepherd,2 to that extent do I deem you happy who at such a time have been thought worthy of being with a man struggling desperately in the strenuous defense of religion. ...

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169. Basil to Gregory

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pp. 330-332

You have undertaken a fitting, kindly, and humane act in bringing together the captive troop of the disdainful Glycerius (for, thus we must write for the present), and in having covered over our common disgrace as far as was possible. Nevertheless, there is need for your Reverence ...

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170. To Glycerius

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pp. 332-333

To what extent do you abandon your common sense, and, while planning unwisely concerning your own actions, both disturb us and shame the whole order of monks? Return, then, trusting in God and in us who imitate His loving kindness. For, even though we have rebuked you like a father, ...

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171. To Gregory

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p. 333

I wrote to you just lately concerning Glycerius and the virgins. They have not yet returned even to this day, but they are still delaying; for what reason and how they are doing so, I do not know. Now, I would not bring this as a charge against you, that you are doing this to discredit ...

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172. To Bishop Sophronius

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pp. 333-334

How much joy your letter gave us, we need not write. For, you can assuredly surmise it from the nature of the news which you sent. In fact, in your letter you showed us the first fruit of the Spirit, which is charity. Now, what could be more precious to us than this in the present state of affairs, ...

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173. To the Canoness Theodora

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pp. 335-336

The fact that we are not sure of our letters being placed in the hands of your Charity, but through the wickedness of those serving as carriers they may be read first by countless others, makes us hesitant about writing, especially now, when affairs everywhere are in such confusion. ...

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174. To a Widow

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pp. 336-337

Although I desired very much to write regularly to your Nobility, I always restrained myself. I feared lest, perchance, I should seem to provoke trials for you because of those who are ill-disposed toward us, and, as I hear, are pushing their hatred to such a measure that they inquire impertinently ...

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175. To Count Magnenianus

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pp. 337-338

Recently, your Dignity sent me a letter about certain other matters, and also expressly enjoined that we should write concerning the faith. I do admire your zeal in this affair and I pray to God that you may adhere unyieldingly to your choice of the good, and that, always advancing in knowledge and good works, you may attain perfection. ...

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176. To Amphilochius, Bishop of Iconium

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pp. 338-339

May the holy God grant that this letter of ours come into your hands when you are in good health of body, free of all business, and faring in all things according to your will, in order that our invitation may not be unavailing. ...

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177. To the Master Sophronius

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pp. 339-340

To enumerate all those who have received benefits from your Lordship through our mediation is not easy. We are indeed conscious of having aided many through your mighty hand, which the Lord has bestowed on us as an ally in the most critical times. ...

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178. To Aburgius

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pp. 340-341

I am aware that I have frequently recommended many persons to your Honor and have been quite serviceable at most critical times to those in afHiction. Yet, I know that I have sent to your Modesty no one who is more honored in my sight or who is striving for anything of greater importance ...

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179. To Arinthaeus

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p. 341

Both the generosity of your nature and your affability toward all make sufficiently plain to us that you are a lover not only of freedom but also of man. We, therefore, serve confidently as an ambassador for a man illustrious through a long line of ancestors, ...

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180. To the Master Sophronius, in Behalf of Eumathius

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p. 342

I have suffered much in spirit on meeting with a worthy man who had been subjected to an unendurable situation. For, since I am a man, why should I not share the suffering of a free man who is involved in troubles beyond his desert? ...

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181. To Otreius of Meletine

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pp. 342-343

I realize that the separation from Bishop Eusebius, dearly beloved of God, affects your Reverence as much even as ourselves. Since, then, we both need comfort, let us become a consolation to each other. You write to us the news from Samosata, ...

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182. To the Presbyters of Sarnosata

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p. 343

As much as we are grieved when we consider the desolation2 of your church, to that extent do we congratulate you, who have already reached this point of the struggle. May the Lord grant that you pass through this with patient endurance, ...

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183. To the Senate of Samosata

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pp. 343-344

Whenever I consider that our trial has already spread through the whole world, and that the greatest of the cities in Syria have experienced misfortunes equal to your own, and that nowhere is there a Senate so esteemed and distinguished for good works as yours at present proclaimed for its zeal in good works, ...

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184. To Eustathius, Bishop of Himmeria

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pp. 344-345

I know that orphanhood is a condition of sadness and much work because it entails the loss of those set over us. Therefore, I infer that your Reverence, too, being saddened by what has happened, does not write to us and is at the same time even more engaged now in visiting the flocks of Christ because the enemies are rising up from every side. ...

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185. To Theodotus, Bishop of Berrhoea

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p. 345

I know that, even if you do not write to us, the memory of us is nevertheless present in your heart. And I take as an indication of this, not the fact that I myself am worthy of any kindly remembrance, but that your soul is rich in its superabundance of charity. ...