Front Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Inside Flap

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Copyright Information

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Table of Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. v

read more

Foreword

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-ix

In his earliest thinking about American federal government, even before the Constitutional Convention of 1787, James Madison sought a system that would, as he put it, end “government by party”: end government by special interests (“factions”) that failed to discern and rule in the public good. As president, Madison had abundant and excruciating opportunities to defend...

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. xi

The editors of this volume gratefully acknowledge the assistance that their project received from several sources. Ralph Ketcham of Syracuse University provided valuable advice at a key stage and kindly agreed to add a foreword to the book. Sean O’Brien and Jen Howell, at James Madison’s...

Some Explanatory Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xviii

read more

1. Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-7

With no consensus of the two political parties, the government of the United States decides to go to war. The war of choice is waged on the assumption that it will be brief and decisive. There is little advance planning for how to pay for—and prevail in—an unexpectedly protracted and complicated...

read more

2. The "Party War" of 1812: Yesterday's Lessons for Today's Partisan Politics

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 8-35

The most distinctive feature of American politics in recent decades has been the deepening polarization of the political parties.1 Democrats and Republicans have seemed unable to bridge their fundamental differences or to compromise, even on the country’s most urgent imperatives. Disagreements...

read more

3. The War of 1812 and the Rise of American Military Power

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 36-66

On June 15, 1812, three days before America’s declaration of war against Great Britain, former president John Adams sardonically assessed the young nation’s chances in its impending confrontation with the mightiest sea power in the world. Unlike most of his fellow New Englanders and Federalists,...

read more

4. Dual Nationalisms: Legacies of the War of 1812

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 67-96

On both the left and the right, American politicians and pundits frequently complain that the country has strayed from the original vision of our heroic national founders, the men who declared independence in 1776 and crafted the Constitution in 1787. According to Representative Mike Pence (R-Ind.),...

read more

5. James Madison, Presidential Power, and Civil Liberties in the War of 1812

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 97-121

In November of 1814, the White House lay in ashes, burned to the ground by British troops. President James Madison was living in temporary quarters at the so-called Octagon House, having returned to Washington after fleeing the city. His government had seen division and humiliation, and it had...

read more

6. The War over Federalism: The Constitutional Battles in the War of 1812

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 122-152

The United States has declared war five times. It did so for the first time in 1812, and Americans immediately recognized that declaring war put them in an unprecedented constitutional no-man’s-land. They were right. The Constitution had provided the means for the United States to declare war,...

Contributors

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 153

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 155-164

Back Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF