Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

Our translation is based on the copy of the Tenpuku-bon owned by Gakush in University. Transliteration of the text follows that found in Takeoka Masao’s Ise monogatari zen hyōshaku (Ybun Shoin, 1987). Romanization represents historical kana usage (kyū-kanazukai), although proper nouns are rendered in Hepburn romanization ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

We would like to thank Tesshinsai Bunko, Ashizawa Misako, for permission to reproduce the illustrations from the copy of the Saga-bon edition in their possession. Many thanks also to Professor Yamamoto Tokurō and Masumi Abe El-Khoury. We are grateful to Susan Tyler and Sharalyn Orbaugh for reading the manuscript ...

Textual Matters

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p. ix

Abbreviations

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p. x

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Introduction

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pp. 1-12

Japan’s aristocratic age, the Heian period (794–1185), saw the emergence of the literary court romance, or monogatari. The best known of these works is without a doubt Genji monogatari (The Tale of Genji). A fair amount is known about the Genji and its composition: it was written by a woman known as Murasaki Shikibu ...

The Ise Stories: Ise monogatari

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pp. 13-248

Appendix 1: Principal Characters, Commentators, and Commentaries

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pp. 249-252

Appendix 2: Family Tree of Principal Characters

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pp. 253-254

Bibliography

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pp. 255-258

Index of First Lines of Poems

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pp. 259-261

Index of First Lines of Translated Poems

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pp. 262-264

Subject Index

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pp. 265-269