Cover, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-v

Contents

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pp. vii-vii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

It took a long time to complete this book, and I could not have done it without the guidance and support of a number of persons and institutions. I relish this opportunity to thank them. First, my thanks go to scholars associated with the University of Chicago who helped me through the book’s dissertation stage. This ...

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Introduction

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pp. xi-xvi

In 1907, two years after it became a Japanese protectorate and three years before it was forcibly annexed to Japan, Korea was known in the West as a hermit nation, a backward and introverted country, unwilling to be assimilated into modernity.1 For Korean Protestants, however, 1907 was a watershed year ...

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Chapter 1. Breakthrough for a New Moral Order, 1885–1919

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pp. 1-45

From a century or so before 1885, when Protestant evangelism began in earnest in Korea, till the demise of the Chosŏn dynasty in 1910, Korea experienced cultural distortion.1 The roots of this distortion were varied and cumulative. In part, it was caused by famines and epidemics that had devastated ...

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Chapter 2. Conflict, Introversion, and a Tradition of Korean Revivalists, 1920–1953

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pp. 46-83

Though the March First Movement failed to bring national independence to Koreans, it did bring an end to the so-called Dark Period of the Japanese rule in Korea.1 For evangelicalism and Korean people in general, however, this did not mean that the remainder of the Japanese rule would ...

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Chapter 3. Evangelicalism Takes Off in South Korea, 1953–1988

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pp. 84-114

From the great revival of 1907 till the onset of Japanese repression, the rapid growth of evangelicalism in Korea had continually elicited enthusiasm from the international Protestant community. The first non-Koreans to express such enthusiasm were the Korea missionaries themselves, whose success ...

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Chapter 4. The Intensely Practical and Devotional Character of Korean Evangelicalism

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pp. 115-138

In 1990 Harold L. Willmington, vice president of the fundamentalist Liberty University in Virginia, visited South Korea. During his visit, Willmington observed various aspects of the Korean Protestant Church. Apparently impressed by what he saw, he lauded the church for the central role it plays ...

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Epilogue: The Beleaguered Success of Korean Evangelicalism in the 1990s

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pp. 139-151

At the beginning of the twentieth century, Christians constituted less than 1 percent of the Korean population.1 Near the end of the century, according to a 1995 survey by the South Korean National Statistics Office, Christians constituted 26.3 percent of the population, surpassing Buddhists, ...

Notes

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pp. 153-198

Bibliography

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pp. 199-220

Index

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pp. 221-228