Cover

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title Page, copyright PAge

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xvi

I realize that almost everyone who ever finishes a book begins to think about the acknowledgements midway through the writing when they realize how long they have been at it, and how much longer it will take to finish. It either occurs to writers then or when they are challenged by long periods of distraction ...

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1. Introduction

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pp. 1-22

The year 2010 marked several important anniversaries in my work as a Black feminist scholar and anti-violence activist. More than 25 years earlier, I was one of a group of women of color living in New York City who organized one of the country’s first community-based anti-violence programs for women of color. ...

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2. The Problem of Male Violence against Black Women

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pp. 23-64

Readers unfamiliar with the problem of violence against Black women may dismiss stories like Tanya’s, the brutal police violence that Ms. B experienced, or the sexual aggression in Greenwich Village as a strange mix of extreme or bizarre events that have little similarity to what we commonly consider a “typical case” of gender abuse. ...

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3. How We Won the Mainstream but Lost the Movement

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pp. 65-98

Around the time that I began collecting stories of women like Tanya, Ms. B was assaulted, and when the New Jersey 4 were convicted, there was a national celebration of the decennial anniversary of the Violence Against Women Act, which had passed with bipartisan support. Former Attorney General John Ashcroft was one of the featured speakers.1 ...

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4. Black Women, Male Violence, and the Buildup of a Prison Nation

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pp. 99-124

Activists and advocates, who are part of the Chicago Taskforce on Violence against Girls and Young Women, called for the Cook County (Chicago) State’s Attorney to drop charges against Tiawanda Moore and release her from jail, where she is detained after being arrested and charged with two counts of eavesdropping and a domestic dispute. ...

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5. The Matrix: A Black Feminist Response to Male Violence and the State

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pp. 125-156

Tamika Huston was 24 years old when she went missing in Spartanburg, South Carolina in May 2004.1 Natalee Holloway was 19 when she disappeared almost a year later during a high school graduation trip to Aruba. Originally from a wealthy suburb of Birmingham, Alabama, Natalee Holloway was a member of the National Honor Society ...

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6. Conclusion

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pp. 157-166

December 22, 2010 marked the tenth anniversary of Kemba Smith’s release from Danbury Correctional Facility, a Federal Prison for women in Connecticut, where she served six-and-a-half years on a felony conspiracy charge. Kemba’s story, which has received international attention, brought into sharp focus ...

Notes

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pp. 167-178

Bibliography

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pp. 179-218

Index

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pp. 219-228

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About the Author

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p. 229

Beth E. Richie is Director of the Institute for Research on Race and Public Policy, Professor of African American Studies and Criminology, Law, and Justice at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and author of Compelled to Crime: The Gender Entrapment of Battered Black Women.