In this Book

Citizen Rauh
summary
Citizen Rauh tells the story of American lawyer Joseph L. Rauh Jr., who kept alive the ideals of New Deal liberalism and broadened those ideals to include a commitment to civil rights. Rauh's clients included Arthur Miller, Lillian Hellman, A. Philip Randolph, and the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. With good reason Freedom Rider John Lewis once called him "the blackest white man I ever knew." No lawyer in the post-1945 era did more to protect the economic interests of working-class Americans than Rauh, who fought for the unions as they struggled for legitimacy and against them when they betrayed their own members. No lawyer stood more courageously against repressive anticommunism during the 1950s or advanced the cause of racial justice more vigorously in the 1960s and 1970s. No lawyer did more to defend the constitutional vision of the Warren Court and resist the efforts of Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan to undo its legacy. Throughout his life, Rauh continued to articulate a progressive vision of law and politics, ever confident that his brand of liberalism would become vital once again when the cycle of American politics took another turn. "The causes to which Rauh committed his life retain their moral force today. This well-crafted, often powerful, biographical study will appeal to anyone with a serious interest in postwar liberalism." ---Daniel Scroop, University of Sheffield Michael E. Parrish is Professor of History at the University of California, San Diego.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
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  1. Contents
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  1. Prologue
  2. pp. 1-7
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  1. 1. The Education of Joe Rauh: Race
  2. pp. 8-17
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  1. 2. The Education of Joe Rauh: Law and Politics
  2. pp. 18-27
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  1. 3. New Dealer
  2. pp. 28-42
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  1. 4. “Young Whippersnapper”
  2. pp. 43-56
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  1. 5. Joe, Prich, and Phil
  2. pp. 57-66
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  1. 6. New Dealer at War
  2. pp. 67-77
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  1. 7. Liberal Anticommunist
  2. pp. 78-89
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  1. 8. Sympathetic Associations
  2. pp. 90-106
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  1. 9. Naming Names
  2. pp. 107-120
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  1. 10. Reuther and Randolph
  2. pp. 121-132
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  1. 11. HHH, JFK, and LBJ
  2. pp. 133-146
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  1. 12. A Liberal in Camelot
  2. pp. 147-158
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  1. Illustrations
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  1. 13. Freedom’s Party
  2. pp. 159-174
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  1. 14. Vietnam and the Liberal Crisis
  2. pp. 175-184
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  1. 15. 1968
  2. pp. 185-194
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  1. 16. Jock and the Miners
  2. pp. 195-210
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  1. 17. Union Democracy
  2. pp. 211-223
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  1. 18. Cardozo’s Seat
  2. pp. 224-238
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  1. 19. Saving the Court
  2. pp. 239-252
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  1. 20. The Liberal in Conservative Times
  2. pp. 253-266
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  1. 21. Closing Argument
  2. pp. 267-278
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 279-310
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  1. Selected Bibliography
  2. pp. 311-316
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 317-329
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