Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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Contents

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p. vii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xi

In response to the invitation of the History Department of the Johns Hopkins University to lecture on the subject of history, political culture, and national consciousness, the author of...

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I. Tamed Death

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pp. 1-26

The new behavioral sciences—and linguisticshave introduced the notions of diachrony and synchrony, which will perhaps be helpful to us historians. Since many factors relating to the mentality...

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II. One's Own Death

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pp. 27-54

We have seen how Western civilization had adopted a sort of vulgate of death. Today we shall see that this vulgate was not abandoned or blotted out, but instead was partially altered during the second Middle Ages, that is to...

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III. Thy Death

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pp. 55-84

Thus far we have illustrated two attitudes toward death. The first, the oldest, the longest held, and the most common one, is the familiar resignation to the collective destiny of the species and can be summarized by...

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IV. Forbidden Death

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pp. 85-108

During the long period we have covered, from the Early Middle Ages until the midnineteenth century, the attitude toward death changed, but so slowly that contemporaries did not even notice. In our day, in...

Index

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pp. 109-111