Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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p. vii

Hebrew and Aramaic Transliterations

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pp. ix-x

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Introduction: Kabbalistic Images, Relationality, and a Breastfeeding God

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pp. 1-14

As the kabbalists developed their theology in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, they experimented with new ways to understand the relationships between God, themselves, and the world around them. While earlier Jewish devotion focused on male anthropomorphisms that described God as King, Father, and Judge, the kabbalists expressed their divine relationships through a broader variety of images. ...

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Chapter 1: Breastfeeding and Religious Transmission in Rabbinic Literature

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pp. 15-37

This chapter explores rabbinic texts that use breastfeeding as a metaphor for spiritual transmission. While these works do not identify God as a nursing mother, they contain two themes that are central to the breastfeeding divine’s development in later medieval mystical literature. The first theme presents nursing as a metaphor for transmitting spiritual orientation and is found in stories of prominent Biblical figures...

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Chapter 2: Suckling the Divine Overflow in Early Kabbalah

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pp. 39-63

This chapter looks at three kabbalistic texts from the late twelfth through the early thirteenth centuries. In these works, the image of God as a nursing mother takes shape as part of an emerging mystical theology. As in the previous chapter’s rabbinic literature, the texts apply suckling imagery to the process of spiritual transmission. The early kabbalists, however, divert the metaphor from its human context...

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Chapter 3: God as a Nursing Mother in Sefer ha-Zohar

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pp. 65-88

This chapter examines the image of God as a nursing mother in Sefer ha-Zohar (The Book of Splendor), the quintessential work of kabbalistic literature. As in the previous chapter’s early kabbalistic writings, the Zohar applies the suckling-as-spiritual-transmission metaphor to divinity, using it to define spiritual overflow’s passage among the sefirot and between the divine and human worlds. While early kabbalists...

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Chapter 4: Concluding Thoughts on the Nursing Divine

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pp. 89-109

Kabbalah’s divine nursing imagery encourages an interactive relationship between God and human beings by modeling divine character and humanity’s relationship to that character along the lines of a tender family interaction. This model, which draws on all the positive emotional qualities of a mother suckling her newborn child, creates an intimate social bond that complements and corrects other divine...

Notes

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pp. 111-173

Bibliography

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pp. 175-188

Index

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pp. 189-193

Back Cover

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