Cover

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Contents

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pp. vii-vii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

I was extremely honored by the invitation to give the first set of Singleton Lectures at the Charles Singleton Center for the Study of Pre-Modern Europe of the Johns Hopkins University in October 2010. This book presents a revised version of those lectures. At Johns Hopkins I should like to express my gratitude especially to Christopher Celenza, codirector of the Singleton Center; ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-13

The numerous Latin letters on medical subjects written by sixteenth-century physicians constitute one small part of a much larger universe of early modern European learned and scientific correspondence. For a generation now, the role of correspondence in early modern erudition and exchange of ideas, of arguments, of objects of interest to collectors ...

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1. Contexts and Communication

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pp. 14-37

This chapter considers some examples of letters exchanged in the middle and later decades of the sixteenth century between learned physicians in Italy and in northern Europe that subsequently came to be included in contemporary printed collections of medical letters. Though its primary concern is with letters as they appeared in printed collections, ...

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2. The Court Physician Johann Lange and His Epistolae Medicinales

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pp. 38-61

Reusner was Lange’s distant relative; his words occur in the preface he wrote for a posthumous edition of Lange’s Epistolae prepared by yet another relative, Georg Wirth, for a time a court physician to Charles V and Philip II and Lange’s confidant and heir. Lange’s German world was, as Reusner’s preface makes clear, ...

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3. The Medical Networks of Orazio Augenio

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pp. 62-84

The medical letters of Johann Lange were the product of an early to mid-sixteenth-century career in which a relatively brief period of university study and teaching led to lifetime tenure at a German princely court. Lange’s intellectual formation was rooted in the first generation of medical humanism in German universities, ...

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Conclusion

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pp. 85-88

Published collections of medical letters were at least in part a humanistic genre in origin, inspired, like compilations of Renaissance letters relating to other areas of knowledge, by interest in ancient letters and letter writing, enthusiasm for the recovery of ancient literary forms, and appreciation of the openness and diversity of a format appropriate for all kinds of inquiry and critique. ...

Notes

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pp. 89-154

Index

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pp. 155-163