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Science Transformed?
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Advancements in computing, instrumentation, robotics, digital imaging, and simulation modeling have changed science into a technology-driven institution. Government, industry, and society increasingly exert their influence over science, raising questions of values and objectivity. These and other profound changes have led many to speculate that we are in the midst of an epochal break in scientific history. This edited volume presents an in-depth examination of these issues from philosophical, historical, social, and cultural perspectives. It offers arguments both for and against the epochal break thesis in light of historical antecedents. Contributors discuss topics such as: science as a continuing epistemological enterprise; the decline of the individual scientist and the rise of communities; the intertwining of scientific and technological needs; links to prior practices and ways of thinking; the alleged divide between mode-1 and mode-2 research methods; the commodification of university science; and the shift from the scientific to a technological enterprise. Additionally, they examine the epochal break thesis using specific examples, including the transition from laboratory to real world experiments; the increased reliance on computer imaging; how analog and digital technologies condition behaviors that shape the object and beholder; the cultural significance of humanoid robots; the erosion of scientific quality in experimentation; and the effect of computers on prediction at the expense of explanation.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. SCIENCE TRANSFORMED?
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  1. CONTENTS
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  2. p. vii
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  1. Science after theEnd of Science?
  2. pp. 1-16
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  1. PART I
  2. p. 17
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  1. The Age of Technoscience
  2. pp. 19-30
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  1. We Are Not Witnesses to a New Scientific Revolution
  2. pp. 31-42
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  1. “Knowledge Is Power,”or How to Capturethe Relationshipbetween Science andTechnoscience
  2. pp. 43-53
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  1. Climbing the Hill
  2. pp. 54-65
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  1. Breaking Up with the Epochal Break
  2. pp. 66-79
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  1. Science and Its Recent History
  2. pp. 80-92
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  1. Knowledge Makingnin Transition
  2. pp. 93-105
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  1. Alliances between Styles
  2. pp. 106-116
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  1. PART II
  2. p. 117
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  1. Experimenting with the Concept of Experiment
  2. pp. 119-134
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  1. Intensification, Not Transformation
  2. pp. 135-146
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  1. Technologies of Viewing
  2. pp. 147-158
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  1. Technoscience as Popular Culture
  2. pp. 159-176
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  1. The Good Old Days
  2. pp. 177-188
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  1. Toward a New Culture of Prediction
  2. pp. 189-200
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  1. Epilogue
  2. pp. 201-206
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  1. CONTRIBUTORS
  2. pp. 207-212
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  1. INDEX
  2. pp. 213-222
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  1. Back Cover
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