In this Book

African Intellectuals and Decolonization
summary

The incompleteness of the decolonization struggle is evident in the fact that Africa today remains widely associated with chaos, illness, and disorder. This misconception is a latter-day invocation of the idea of “the white man’s burden,” which was central in providing justifica-tion for the violence of Europe’s military conquest and colonial occupation of Africa. The essays in this collection address the enduring intellectual legacies of European colonialism in Africa. The challenge for African and non-African scholars alike is to establish the fact of African humanity, in all its diversity, and to enable the representation of Africa beyond its historical role as the foil to Western humanity. The significant contribution of this volume is to move the discussion of decolonization in Africa to the postcolonial period, and to begin a post-neocolonial phase in the Academy. All of the essays address topics and themes in African states and societies since those states achieved political independence. African Intellectuals and Decolonization addresses the enduring intellectual legacies of European colonialism in Africa while providing scholarly tools to assist in the ongoing processes of decolonizing the Academy and the African continent more broadly. 

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright Page
  2. pp. iii-iv
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-11
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  1. Part I: Representation and Retrospection
  2. pp. 13-13
  1. We Need a Mau Mau in Mississippi
  2. pp. 15-26
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  1. Nkrumah/Lumumba
  2. pp. 27-36
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  1. Trauma and Narrativity in Aidichie's Half of a Yellow Sun
  2. pp. 37-65
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  1. Part II: Decolonizing Public Spheres: Conflicts and Negotiations
  2. pp. 67-67
  1. The Emergent Self in South African Black Conciousness Literature and Discourse
  2. pp. 69-82
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  1. The Public Life of Reason
  2. pp. 83-101
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  1. Setting the Agenda for Decolonizing African Media Systems
  2. pp. 102-116
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  1. The African Renaissance and Discourse Ownership
  2. pp. 117-134
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  1. Part III: Decolonizing Knowledge: Intellectual Imperatives and Epistemic Dialogues
  2. pp. 135-135
  1. Decolonization and the Practice of Philosophy
  2. pp. 137-159
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  1. Beyond Gendercentric Models
  2. pp. 160-179
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 181-183
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