Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

John Monro had a way of changing people’s lives, and I am no exception. Reading his obituary in the Boston Globe triggered my decision to take early retirement, and writing his biography has provided me with a decade of inspiration, surprises, frustrations, and stimulation

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xvi

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-5

Dateline New York City, 9 March 1967. Reporters from across the country are gathered at the New York Hilton. Facing them are two men, one black and one white. Both are tall, imposing, middle-aged figures....

read more

1. Family Background and Childhood, 1912–1930

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 6-23

The Monro family name has been linked with challenge, adventure, and the dramatic contours of the Scottish landscape since 1891. That year Sir Hugh T. Munro finished identifying and charting...

read more

2. Undergraduate Years, 1930–1934

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 24-35

Monro began undergraduate life in Smith Hall, where he shared a top-floor dormer suite with Arthur T. Hamlin and George W. “Cat” Caturani (Hamlin 1). Fortunately for posterity, Hamlin...

read more

3. Interim Years and War Years, 1935–1945

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 36-53

After commencement Monro was in limbo. Dottie had graduated and was hoping to open a school with a friend in September, and his buddies from the Journal had gone home or had begun working...

read more

4. Administrator Monro, 1946–1958

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 54-65

Monro spent the first few months of civilian life in South Freeport with Dottie and the girls, repainting the cottage, stoking the woodburning stove for heat, and working sporadically on what he jokingly...

read more

5. Dean Monro, 1958–1962

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 66-82

If you are looking for a clear description of Monro’s duties as dean, you will not find it in the official Records of the Dean of Harvard College, even though they stretch back to 1889. Instead, you will get a motley list of roles the dean is expected to fill: “teacher, friend, counselor...

read more

6. Moving toward Miles, 1962–1964

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 83-106

Returning from Cranbrook, Monro wasted little time mourning the absence of the Peace Corps training program at Harvard; instead, he flew to Miami and attended a weeklong conference of the American Teachers...

read more

7. Final Years as Dean, 1964–1967

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 107-126

Monro returned to New England when the summer workshop ended, but as the 1964–65 school year began at Harvard, the matters that demanded his attention paled in comparison to the issues taking...

read more

8. New Home, New Challenges, 1967–1971

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 127-158

Monro was so eager to begin his new job that he begged Phil to drive him to Logan Airport the moment commencement festivities were over. In the car Dreyer listened patiently while Monro, preaching to the choir, insisted once again that going to Miles was an enviable opportunity rather than...

read more

9. Going It Alone, 1971–1978

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 159-180

The summer of Pitts’s departure, Monro went to Evanston to help Phil, Janet, and the children move to Atlanta, where Phil had accepted a position as assistant professor of psychology and educational studies...

read more

10. This Looks like the Place, 1978–1984

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 181-204

As Monro became more uncomfortable at Miles, he was drawn to Tougaloo for a multitude of reasons. The first was its leadership role in the civil rights movement, which can be understood only in the context...

read more

11. Weathering Changes, 1984–1995

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 205-226

On 1 June 1984 J. Herman Blake became president of Tougaloo, stepping down as provost of Oakes College to do so. It is easy to see why the search committee found him attractive. He was a scholar in his own right...

read more

12. Final Postings, 1995–2002

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 227-232

Sutton’s death heightened Monro’s awareness of his own declining powers, although he had suspected for some time that his memory lapses were due to Alzheimer’s. In fact, the disease may have been...

read more

Epilogue

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 233-236

Like his father and brothers before him, Monro was cremated, but figuratively speaking, his remains are widely dispersed. Every year, as college application deadlines loom, countless high school seniors...

Images

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

NOTES

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 237-244

BIBLIOGRAPHY

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 245-262

INDEX

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 263-285