Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication, Quotes

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pp. iii-vii

Contents

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pp. ix-ix

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Preface

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pp. xi-xvii

This book is a sequel to Art Matters: Hemingway, Craft, and the Creation of the Modern Short Story (2010). In Art Matters, my goal was to provide the definitive study of Hemingway’s short story aesthetics, exploring what he learned from previous artists—such as Poe, Cézanne, Maupassant, Henry ...

I. Full Encounters of the Close Kind

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1. Really Reading a Hemingway Story: The Example of “Indian Camp”

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pp. 3-85

From mid-February through April 1924, the start of an extraordinary period of creativity that would last five years, Hemingway completed eight of the stories that would comprise the bulk of In Our Time.1 The first of these stories, “Indian Camp,” marked the introduction of Nick Adams, ...

II. How Craft Readings Contribute to Understanding Stories

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2. Dueling Wounds in “Soldier’s Home”: The Relation of Textual Form, Narrative Argument, and Cultural Critique

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pp. 89-111

In the previous chapter, I performed an exhaustive reading of a Hemingway story in order to support the validity of three claims: that careful attention to articulated technique is necessary for fully understanding a short story’s aesthetic and cultural dimensions; that the author is much ...

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3. The “Pointless” Story: What Is “A Canary for One”?

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pp. 112-150

There is no critical debate about the merits of either “Indian Camp” or “Soldier’s Home.” Both stories have been frequently anthologized and highly praised, and each is rich in interpretive possibilities and open to a wide range of critical methodologies. But “A Canary for One” is a different ...

III. Metacritical and Metafictional Hemingway

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4. Hemingway on (Mis)Reading Stories: “God Rest You Merry, Gentlemen” as Metacriticism

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pp. 153-166

In our first three chapters, we have seen that craft approaches to the short story need not inevitably lead, as many academics now cavalierly assume, to “mere” formalism, or worse, “empty” formalism. I have tried to show that an understanding of form, craft, art, and technique contributes to ...

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5. Hemingway on (Mis)Writing Stories: “Big Two-Hearted River” as Metafiction

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pp. 167-192

In this chapter we move from a story about mutilation and despair to one about healing and hope, from a callow narrator undergoing an initiation into the complexities of human society to an experienced protagonist immersing himself in the non-human world. We also move from a ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 193-195

Warner Berthoff, Marc Dolan, and Philip Fisher read the initial version of this manuscript, and their many insightful comments contributed to making it into a much better book. I am deeply grateful to LSU Press’s external reader and Hemingway scholar extraordinaire, Joseph M. Flora, for ...

Notes

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pp. 197-213

Works Cited

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pp. 215-223

Index

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pp. 225-233