Cover, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

This work came to life in 2003 as a research project at the Documentation Center of Cambodia (DC-Cam), Phnom Penh. In due course I was able to organize my findings into a semicoherent scheme, and this further transmogrified into a monograph (Harris 2007) published by DC-Cam some four years later. ...

Note on Transliteration

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pp. xi-xii

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Introduction

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pp. 1-11

In the course of writing this book, I began to realize that it was, in part, a semiconscious homage to Holmes Welch’s very fine Buddhism under Mao. While I cannot claim that author’s experience or breadth of knowledge, I intend that this offering will, however imperfect, stand as a memorial to the many Cambodian Buddhist monks and laypeople, ...

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Chapter One: Unraveling of the Buddhist State

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pp. 12-28

Following King Sisowath Monivong’s death in April 1941, an adolescent prince, Norodom Sihanouk, came to the Cambodian throne under close French tutelage. This unenviable position ensured that he was discredited in the eyes of Cambodians who were opposed to foreign control. ...

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Chapter Two: Buddhism and the Origins of Cambodian Communism

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pp. 29-42

From its foundation in 1930, the Indochinese Communist Party (ICP) had made sporadic attempts to recruit the first generation of Cambodian anticolonialists. Two young monks appear to have been involved with the first known Khmer communist, Ben Krahom (Kiernan 1981, 161–162), and another shadowy figure, ...

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Chapter Three: Buddhism and Khmer Communism: A Shared Conceptual Terrain

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pp. 43-63

Duch (b. 1942) was the chief of the Khmer Rouge S-21 security facility at Tuol Sleng, where around sixteen thousand persons perished during Democratic Kampuchea.1 He had been educated at the Lycée Sisowath and in 1959 came in second in the country’s national baccalaureate examinations. ...

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Chapter Four: Dealing with Monks

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pp. 64-89

The communists’ first formal contacts with individual pagodas occurred at differing times, depending on the progress of the conflict. In provinces such as Stung Treng and certain districts of Svay Rieng, such contact happened almost immediately after Sihanouk was overthrown. ...

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Chapter Five: Buddhist Practice and Material Culture under the Khmer Rouge

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pp. 90-117

The ordination of a monk is arguably the most significant of all Buddhist rituals. It is a two-stage process, starting with the “going forth” (pabbajjā) of the novice (sāmaṇera) and followed sometime later by a higher-level initiation (upasampadā) into the status of the fully ordained monk (bhikkhu). ...

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Chapter Six: Monk Mortality and the Destruction of Institutional Buddhism

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pp. 118-138

In the 1950s the Khmer Workers’ Party still reflected its connections with the saṅgha by describing significant segments of the Buddhist monastic order as possessing a “patriotic, progressive and national outlook” (Sher 2004, 70). Many of these monks were close enough to the land to have some “peasantlike characteristics,” ...

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Chapter Seven: Aftermath: Rebuilding the Saṅgha under Socialism

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pp. 139-167

During the Khmer Republic period, prophecies circulated predicting the demise of Buddhism. As the Khmer Rouge grip on the country tightened, they seemed to be coming true. By 1978 Yun Yat, the minister of culture, information, and propaganda, told a Yugoslav reporter that “Buddhism is dead ...

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Conclusion

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pp. 168-172

Since 1979 the Cambodian political landscape has shifted from a uniquely extreme and nationalistic communism to one marked by a strange amalgam of postconflict democratization, dominant party authoritarianism, and unregulated market liberalism.1 As Buddhism has begun the process of recovery following its almost total liquidation, ...

Notes

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pp. 173-208

Abbreviations and Glossary

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pp. 209-212

Bibliography

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pp. 213-238

Index

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pp. 239-242