Cover

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Contents

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p. v

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Series Foreword

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pp. ix-x

I am pleased to present the sixth book in the Food, Health, and the Environment series. This series explores the global and local dimensions of food systems, and examines issues of access, justice, and environmental and community...

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Preface

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pp. xi-xiv

The thermometer in my truck read 112 degrees in Delano, California, on the last day that I conducted fieldwork for this book. It felt appropriate—I had spent many sweltering days in the Central Valley. Besides, that day, just like my fi rst one in the...

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Acknowledgments

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p. xv

This book is my effort to pull apart the multiple notions of justice at work in the world around us, and identify how those ideas then shape the way we solve environmental problems. Melanie DuPuis gets credit for pushing me to let my informants define justice for me, think about the different meanings of jus...

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1 Introducing Environmental Justices

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pp. 1-24

In the past forty years, the environmental movement has radically transformed how we think about the interrelationships between social and ecological systems. Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, published in 1962, was a crucial moment...

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2 Assessing the Scope and Severity of Pesticide Drift

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pp. 25-50

In this chapter, I illustrate why I find pesticide drift to be an egregious problem worthy of critical investigation. To do this, I showcase a wide array of technical evidence of pesticide illness and drift. Understanding the scope of pesticide drift requires...

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3 The Crop Protection Industry

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pp. 51-84

Countless writers have described California’s pivotal role in the emergence of the highly specialized form of growing food and fiber that we refer to as conventional, modern, or industrial agriculture.1 As historian Steven Stoll points out, the exceptionally productive nature of California agriculture does not stem as much....

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4 The Environmental Regulatory State

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pp. 85-144

As the preceding chapter showed, industries are not able to effectively control problems like pesticide drift on their own. State institutions are needed to serve that function. In this chapter, I discuss the ways that government agencies...

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5 The Alternative Agrifood Movement

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pp. 145-186

Industry and the state are not, of course, the only actors who play a role in addressing agrifood system problems like pesticide drift. Over the past fifty years, countless individuals and organizations have endeavored to change the agrifood...

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6 Conclusion

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pp. 187-204

Pesticide drift is like so many environmental problems today: diffuse, elusive, hazardous, and invisible. As demonstrated by news reports of pesticide exposure in as far- reaching places as the United Kingdom, the Philippines, and Hawaii as...

Notes

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pp. 205-234

References

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pp. 235-268

Index

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pp. 269-277