Cover

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Rhetoric in the Modern Era Series

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Title Page

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Copyright

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Contents

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p. vii

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Acknowledgments

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p. ix

A number of people have contributed to my work on this project. I first thank the editors of the Rhetoric in the Modern Era series, Arthur E. Walzer and Edward Schiappa, whose interest in the project and excellent suggestions for revision have made this book possible. I also thank Karl Kageff, editor...

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Chapter 1: Introduction: Thomas De Quincey’s Dialogic Rhetoric

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pp. 1-17

Most accounts of British rhetorical history end with the 1828 publication of Richard Whately’s Elements of Rhetoric. The long-standing assumption that Whately speaks the final word about British rhetorical theory has led to gaps in British rhetorical history, as it has obscured other nineteenth-century...

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Chapter 2: De Quincey’s Life

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pp. 18-44

De Quincey’s rhetoric emphasizes subjectivity, an orientation that is reflected in his own literary corpus, which focuses extensively on the events of his life and his complex interpretation of those events. As discussed in the previous chapter, De Quincey conceives of rhetoric as an intensive, subjective...

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Chapter 3: Eddying Thoughts and Dialogical Potential

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pp. 45-77

De Quincey’s facility with classical languages, immersion in contemporary concerns, and unorthodox outlook are all factors in his development of a rhetoric that is grounded in earlier traditions but anticipates the changing intellectual climate of the nineteenth century. De Quincey’s position as a theorist of...

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Chapter 4: De Quincey’s “Science of Style”

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pp. 78-102

As the previous chapter argues, De Quincey responds to what he perceives as a decline in the intellectual energy of nineteenth-century society with an argument for rhetoric’s capacity to revitalize public life through facilitating a free and imaginative exploration of the individual’s subjectivity. His Romantic...

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Chapter 5: De Quincey’s Writing: Dialogic Rhetoric in Action

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pp. 103-127

De Quincey’s presentation of his ideas about rhetoric defies expectations for cohesion and consistency that traditionally surround the genre of the rhetorical treatise. Embedded in De Quincey’s notion of rhetoric is the presumption that systematic accounts of how rhetoric should function jeopardize the subjective...

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Chapter 6: De Quincey’s Place in Rhetorical Histories

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pp. 128-148

Thomas De Quincey’s rhetorical theory and practice offers a modern alternative to classical theories that define rhetoric in terms of an interaction among speaker, text, and audience directed toward addressing specific civic questions. De Quincey’s writings about rhetoric, language, and style draw upon his interpretation of classical and modern rhetorical theories, criticism...

Works Cited and Referenced

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pp. 149-156

Index

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pp. 157-165

Author Biography

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p. 166

Books in the Rhetoric in the Modern Era Series

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p. 1

Back Cover

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