Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xvi

I have had the good fortune to receive assistance from a number of institutions and individuals over the many years that I have worked on this project. Although it is impossible to fully convey...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-9

By the 1830s and 1840s, a small but noticeable number of free African Americans living in the North had received the education and training necessary to take up positions as teachers...

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CHAPTER ONE: African American Advice Literature and Black Middle-Class Self-Fashioning

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pp. 10-36

In the decades aft er the American Revolution and the founding of the new nation, northern states began abolishing the practice of racial slavery. Beginning with the state of Vermont...

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CHAPTER TWO: Slave Narratives and the Black Self-Made Man

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pp. 37-61

In 1855, just weeks aft er emigrating from the United States to Jamaica, abolitionist activist, orator, newspaper editor, and Congregational minister Samuel Ringgold Ward published his life story...

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CHAPTER THREE: Antislavery Discourse and the African American Family

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pp. 62-80

When Harriet Jacobs began writing her memoir, she must have known that her story would be diffi cult to believe. Aft er all, she had spent seven years of her life hiding from her master...

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CHAPTER FOUR: Domestic Literature and the Antislavery Household

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pp. 81-108

Long married to a successful caterer and blessed with three children, Solomon Northup could not wait to leave behind Bayou Boeuf, Louisiana, the scene of his twelve- year captivity in slavery...

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CHAPTER FIVE: Transnationalism, Revolution, and the Anglo-African Magazine on the Eve of the Civil War

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pp. 109-131

When Thomas Hamilton of Brooklyn, New York, launched the Anglo- African Magazine in 1859, he off ered “the fi rst literary magazine produced by and for the black community,” opening a new phase in African...

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Epilogue

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pp. 132-136

Beginning in the early nineteenth century, as a small population of free African Americans carved out a space for their communities in the North, they also created a print culture that spoke to the cultural and political concerns of an emerging black middle class...

Notes

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pp. 137-170

Index

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pp. 171-176