Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-2

read more

About This Edition

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-3

This edition is made available under the imprimatur of DocSouth Books, a cooperative endeavor between the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library and the University of North Carolina Press. Titles in DocSouth Books are drawn from the Library’s "Documenting the American ...

read more

PREFACE.

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 7-10

In aiming to arrest the attention of the reader, ere he proceeds to the unvarnished, but ower true tale of John Andrew Jackson, the escaped Carolinian slave, it might be fairly said that "truth was stranger than fiction," and that the experience of slavery produces a full exhibition of all that is ...

read more

CHAPTER I. MY BIRTH AND TRAINING

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 12-18

I was born in South Carolina. My grandfather was stolen from Africa. My father learned the African method of curing snake bites, and was in consequence, called Dr. Clavern. My mother's name was Betty. I had five brothers and five sisters. Of these, two brothers and two sisters were dead when ...

read more

CHAPTER II. REMINISCENCES OF MY OLD MASTER

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 19-22

We will now speak about my old master, the father of those whom I have spoken of in the above chapter. He was originally a Quaker in North Carolina, United States, but he came to South Carolina and married a lady who had a few slaves. He then set up a liquor store on the Creek Swamp ...

read more

CHAPTER III. MY MISTRESS

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 23-25

My mistress was a native of South Carolina; she was mean to everybody but her own family; she used to say that the bran flour was too good for the slaves to eat. The sight which most delighted her eyes, was to see a slave whipped. John Durant had a large plantation of slaves on Lynch's Creek, ...

read more

CHAPTER IV. MY YOUTHFUL DAYS

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 26-28

My first employment was that of a scarecrow in the corn fields. I was driven into the field at the earliest dawn of day, and I did not leave the field till sunset. My food was a cake made by mixing Indian meal with water and [Page 21] a little salt, and which was then baked in the ashes. This I had to ...

read more

CHAPTER V. MY ESCAPE

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 29-37

A slave on a neighbouring plantation had a pony; it being discovered by his mistress, she ordered the overseer, the Rev. P. Huggin, to kill it. Meanwhile, I went in the night and purchased it of the slave with some fowls. As my master had just then gone out of his mind I could keep it with greater ...

read more

CHAPTER VI. AMERICAN BUTTERFLY AND SLAVERY

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 38-41

A bad man called Old Ben Calo, who was nearly seven feet high, used to go about ditching for different slaveholders, far too lazy to work on his own plantation in the Pine Woods. On one occasion, he wanted me to steal from my master a bushel of corn for him, which I refused to do. This ...

read more

CHAPTER VII. THE NEGRO SONGS

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 41-48

I fear that this chapter will prove to many rather uninteresting; but at the same time, there are many who, I am quite sure, would wish to know what are the songs with which the negroes beguile their ...

ANTI-SLAVERY SONGS

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 49-54

TESTIMONIALS IN FAVOUR OF JOHNANDREW JACKSON, A FUGITIVE SLAVE.

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 55-58