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Asserting Native Resilience
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summary
Indigenous nations are on the frontline of the climate crisis of the twenty-first century. With cultures and economies among the most vulnerable to climate-related catastrophes, Native peoples are developing responses to climate change that serve as a model for Native and non-Native communities alike.  

Native American tribes in the Pacific Northwest and Indigenous peoples around the Pacific Rim have already been deeply affected by droughts, flooding, reduced glaciers and snowmelts, seasonal shifts in winds and storms, and the northward shifting of species on the land and in the ocean. Having survived the historical and ecological wounds inflicted by colonization, industrialization, and urbanization, Indigenous peoples are using tools of resilience that have enabled them to respond to sudden environmental changes. They are creating defenses to harden their communities, mitigate losses, and adapt where possible.

Asserting Native Resilience presents a rich variety of perspectives on Indigenous responses to the climate crisis, reflecting the voices of more than twenty contributors, including tribal leaders, Native and non-Native scientists, scholars, and activists from the Pacific Northwest, British Columbia, Alaska, and Aotearoa / New Zealand. Also included is a resource directory of Indigenous governments, NGOs, and communities that are researching and responding to climate change and a community organizing booklet for use by Northwest tribes.

An invaluable addition to the literature on climate change, Asserting Native Resilience will be useful for students of environmental studies, Native studies, geography, and rural sociology, and will serve as an important reference for Indigenous leaders, tribal members, and environmental agency staff.

Table of Contents

  1. Title Page, Copyright
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  1. TABLE OF CONTENTS
  2. pp. 6-7
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  1. GRAPHICS CREDITS
  2. p. 8
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  1. Tribute to Renée Miller Klosterman Power
  2. p. 9
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  1. FOREWORD: LOOKING AHEAD
  2. pp. 10-12
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  1. INTRODUCTION
  2. pp. 13-20
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  1. PART I. CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES
  2. p. 21
  1. CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES
  2. p. 22
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  1. LAND GRAB ON A GLOBAL SCALE
  2. pp. 23-24
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  1. THE ANCHORAGE DECLARATION
  2. pp. 24-26
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  1. INTERNATIONAL INDIGENOUS PEOPLES FORUM ON CLIMATE CHANGE (IIPFCC) POLICY PAPER ON CLIMATE CHANGE
  2. pp. 26-29
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  1. THE MYSTIC LAKE DECLARATION
  2. pp. 29-32
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  1. KEY NORTH AMERICAN INDIGENOUS CONCERNS
  2. pp. 32-34
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  1. ALASKA: TESTIMONY FROM THE FRONT LINES
  2. pp. 34-37
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  1. SHARING ONE SKIN
  2. pp. 37-40
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  1. WHERE WORDS TOUCH THE EARTH
  2. pp. 40-43
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  1. WATCHING FOR THE SIGNS
  2. pp. 43-46
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  1. DIFFERENT WAYS OF LOOKING AT THINGS
  2. pp. 46-50
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  1. PART II. EFFECTS OF THE CLIMATE CRISIS
  2. p. 51
  1. EFFECTS OF THE CLIMATE CRISIS
  2. p. 52
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  1. CLIMATE THREATS TO PACIFIC NORTHWEST TRIBES AND THE GREAT ECOLOGICAL REMOVAL: KEEPING TRADITIONS ALIVE
  2. pp. 53-68
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  1. CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE QUILEUTE AND HOH NATIONS OF COASTAL WASHINGTON
  2. pp. 68-89
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  1. MAORI PERSPECTIVES ON CLIMATE CHANGE
  2. pp. 89-97
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  1. IMPACTS OF GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE
  2. pp. 97-102
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  1. EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WOMEN’S AND CHILDREN’S HEALTH
  2. pp. 102-106
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  1. PART III. CURRENT RESPONSES
  2. p. 107
  1. CURRENT RESPONSES
  2. p. 108
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  1. INDIGENOUS RESPONSES TO THE INTERNATIONAL CLIMATE CHANGE FRAMEWORK
  2. pp. 109-125
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  1. ON OUR OWN: ADAPTING TO CLIMATE CHANGE
  2. pp. 125-133
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  1. SWINOMISH CLIMATE CHANGE INITIATIVE
  2. pp. 133-145
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  1. PULLING TOGETHER: HONORABLE COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
  2. pp. 145-154
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  1. GROUPS PRESS FOR TRIBE-FRIENDLY RENEWABLE ENERGY POLICIES
  2. pp. 154-155
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  1. A METHANE TO THEIR MADNESS
  2. pp. 155-157
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  1. FINDING COMMON GROUND: Qualco Biogas Project Brings Together Farmers, Natives while Helping the Salmon
  2. pp. 157-158
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  1. PART IV. POSSIBLE PATHS
  2. p. 159
  1. POSSIBLE PATHS
  2. p. 160
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  1. KAUA E MANGERE—DO NOT BE IDLE: Maori Responses in a Time of Climate Change
  2. pp. 161-167
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  1. POTENTIAL PATHS FOR NATIVE NATIONS
  2. pp. 167-175
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  1. NO LONGER THE“MINER’S CANARY”: Indigenous Nations’ Responses to Climate Change
  2. pp. 175-188
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  1. RECOMMENDATIONS TO NATIVE GOVERNMENT LEADERSHIP
  2. pp. 189-192
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  1. PART V. NATIVE CLIMATE CHANGE RESOURCES, AUTHOR BIOGRAPHIES
  2. p. 193
  1. NATIVE CLIMATE CHANGE RESOURCES: Examples of Model Projects and Groups, Organized around NIARI Recommendations
  2. pp. 194-208
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  1. COMMUNITY ORGANIZING BOOKLET ON CLIMATE CHANGE
  2. pp. 208-224
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  1. CONTRIBUTORS’ BIOGRAPHIES
  2. pp. 225-229
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  1. INDEX
  2. pp. 230-239
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