Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-x

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Foreword

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pp. xi-xiv

The translation of Gloria García Rodríguez’s Voices of the Enslaved in Nineteenth-Century Cuba: A Documentary History (first published as La esclavitud desde la esclavitud: La visión de los siervos in Mexico in 1996 and then in Havana in 2003) marks an important moment in the scholarship on Cuban slavery. ...

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Translator’s Preface

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pp. xv-xviii

I have translated many and varied things over the years: journal and magazine articles, books, all kinds of documents, even the résumé of a Chilean pig farmer. The level of difficulty in this translation far surpasses anything that I have ever done: the archaic Spanish, the syntax and sentence structure, the unfamiliar context, the sometimes impenetrable prose. ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-46

Only infrequently do we ourselves have the occasion to listen firsthand to the voices of slaves. In both contemporary and historical literature, the slave voices we routinely hear have been distorted, mediated. We have depended on others, on persons who have never been slaves themselves, to discern these slave voices and to speak on the slaves’ behalf. ...

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1. Slavery and Its Legal Regulation

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pp. 47-54

The King. In the code of laws of the Partidas1 and other bodies of legislation for these realms, in the Collection of Laws of the Kingdom of the Indies, in both general and limited decrees conveyed to my American dominions since the time of their discovery, and in the ordinances, examined by my Council of the Indies, ...

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2. Slaveholders and the Slave Code

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pp. 55-73

Hacendados from this city who own sugar-producing ingenios, advised of the royal decree issued in Aranjuez on May 31 last, which provides for the regulation of the education, treatment, and occupations of slaves in these dominions, submit this reverent representation to Your Majesty. ...

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3. Toward a New Slave Code

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pp. 74-84

For the purpose of devising an effective system that I find acceptable for the health and well-being of those slave populations destined for service on rural farms, compatible with their proper management and growth, and that takes into consideration the servitors’ health and reproduction while performing a fair day’s work for their masters, ...

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4. Slavery and Family Life

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pp. 85-104

. . . Prompted by a complaint from a neighbor woman . . . that his slave Ildefonso had molested her little black chinita [diminutive form of china, young light-skinned black woman], and made her fear . . . dire consequences, Don Diego resolved to apprehend his slave and forcibly detain him with the help of some of his other slaves. ...

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5. The Plantation Social Network

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pp. 105-135

More than a week ago, the deponent and his fellow slaves José Dolores, Gabriel, Manuel, Roque, Esteban, José Elías, Pablo, Fernando, Pedro, Rafael, Casimiro, and Ruperto were out in the scrubland. The deponent was in the infirmary weaving baskets when, at lunchtime, that is at twelve, everyone began to say that they were going off into the scrub, ...

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6. The Labor Relations of Coartado Slaves

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pp. 136-144

. . . On Tuesday, the third of this month, he was unable to come up with his daily wage of four reals that he was obliged to hand over to his mistress. A stranger, a moreno with a full beard, apparently English, purchased half a dozen pairs of shoes from him for a total of nine reals, and then he did not pay for them. ...

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7. The Master’s Violent Hand

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pp. 145-160

The local commissary of Ursulinas reports to you that last night, at approximately eight o’clock, María Ignacia Ayala, parda, registered a complaint with me that in the local grocery next door to her house a black man was being brutally beaten, [the beating] being administered in an outrageous, absolutely intolerable, merciless manner. ...

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8. Freedom Road

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pp. 161-192

When she was taken to Spain, where slavery was forbidden, she effectively was free from the moment that she set foot in that land. An individual reduced to serving as a slave to another [in Spain] would have constituted an anomaly. Indeed, if she were free, and if freedom were a perpetual state, she hardly could become a slave once again by returning to this island. ...

Notes

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pp. 193-204

Bibliography

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pp. 205-208

Index

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pp. 209-220