Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Foreword

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pp. ix-xii

I was socializing with friends at the National Press Club in the summer of 2011, telling stories, as journalists do, over drinks at the bar. I walked down the hallway and chuckled as I passed the wall of fame, filled with stern portraits of the NPC presidents through the years. All...

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Preface

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pp. xiii-xvi

Today women journalists constitute a growing number of Washington women journalists, holding high-profile as well as more mundane jobs. The last forty years have brought them success undreamed of by their predecessors and allowed women to lay the groundwork for playing...

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One: Prelude

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pp. 3-24

With these words Anne Royall, the first woman to report, edit, and publish a Washington newspaper, ended her career as the capital’s first and most notorious woman journalist. She died three months later at...

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Two: A New Generation

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pp. 25-56

So wrote Frances Parkinson Keyes, the Washington correspondent for Good Housekeeping magazine and a novelist of note, when her colleagues at the Women’s National Press Club (WNPC) feted her in 1925 before she left......

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Three: Eleanor Roosevelt and the “Newspaper Girls”

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pp. 57-90

With these words a nervous Eleanor Roosevelt explained to a group of about thirty- five women journalists on March 6, 1933, that she appreciated their importance and planned to hold weekly White House press conferences...

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Four: World War II Shatters Precedents—At Least for a Time

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pp. 91-130

The impact of World War II on Washington women journalists changed the dynamics between journalists and their male employers in line with major shifts generally in women’s roles from housewives to war workers....

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Five: Parties, Power, and Protest in the Sixties and Early Seventies

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pp. 131-178

For many Washington newspaperwomen, the women’s and society pages of the capital’s three major newspapers, the Washington Post, Star, and Daily News, represented their professional homes in the mid- twentieth century...

[Image Plates]

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Six: Clothes, Cameras, and Determination to Move into Broadcasting

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pp. 179-222

In their 1970 account of Washington women journalists, McLendon and Smith called attention to the importance of good looks for women who moved into television as barriers fell following passage of the Civil...

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Seven: A Question of Equity at the End of the Twentieth Century

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pp. 223-268

As politics and journalism became increasingly inseparable in Washington in the last decades of the twentieth century, white men continued to dominate in both fields. While television cut into print and women made...

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Eight: Women Journalists Confront Today’s Media Challenges

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pp. 269-312

The start of the twenty- first century brought sweeping changes to journalism in Washington as well as to the rest of the country. As journalism confronted massive technological upheavals brought by the Internet, newspaper circulation dwindled and news presentation moved to digital...

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Epilogue

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pp. 313-314

In summary, Washington journalism has owed more than it has recognized to the women who have sought to enter its ranks in spite of overwhelming discrimination that marked most of the decades in which they attempted to establish careers. As the governing center of the nation...

List of Abbreviations

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pp. 315-316

Notes

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pp. 317-374

Bibliography

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pp. 375-396

Index

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pp. 397-424