Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright Page

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

This book is a collective effort, even if its shortcomings and errors are strictly my own. No doubt I will forget somebody who helped me because I’m the sort of person who forgets his phone number from time to time. Still, I will do my best to acknowledge the people who made this book possible, and if I...

read more

Introduction: New Forms and Captive Knights in the Age of Jim Crow and Mechanical Reproduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-26

There is still a general feeling that something happened in the expressive art of the United States in the early twentieth century that was different from what went before, something that we might call modernism, something that responded to U.S. modernity, often disparagingly. Following in the footsteps...

read more

1. Dueling Banjos: African American Dualism and Strategies for Black Representation at the Turn of the Century

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 27-65

Paul Gilroy has powerfully claimed that the notion of double consciousness in which the black subject “ever feels his twoness” was used by W. E. B. Du Bois to figure a diasporic and sometimes transatlantic black modernity expressing the ambivalent location of people of African descent simultaneously...

read more

2. Remembering “Those Noble Sons of Ham”: Poetry, Soldiers, and Citizens at the End of Reconstruction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 66-95

Following French social historian Pierre Nora, Richard Terdiman has argued that a particular mark of modernity in Europe—and, ultimately, a central concern of modernism—is the “memory crisis” arising from people’s sense of “the insecurity of their culture’s involvement with its past, the perturbation...

read more

3. The Black City: The Early Jim Crow Migration Narrative and the New Territory of Race

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 96-122

What happened when black became a place, not perhaps yet a country, as Amiri Baraka coined it, and no longer a cluster of cabins on the edge of the plantation, but an urban neighborhood, a seeming city that one could reach by foot, private car, taxi, subway, train, or streetcar? As noted before, one of...

read more

5. Somebody Else’s Civilization: African American Writers, Bohemia, and the New Poetry

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 123-154

In the United States, as elsewhere, the rise of artistic modernism and the emergence of indigenous bohemias in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries were closely linked, though not twinned phenomena. I use the plural rather than speak of bohemia in the singular because, nearly from the...

read more

5. A Familiar and Warm Relationship: Race, Sexual Freedom, and U.S. Literary Modernism

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 155-187

One of the problems in discussing an “American” modernism or avant-garde before the 1920s is the confusion about whether one is talking about art and artistic circles within the United States or whether one includes such expatriates as Henry James, T. S. Eliot, Gertrude Stein, and Ezra Pound. While...

read more

Conclusion: “Our Beautiful White. . ."

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 188-216

By 1919 the symbolic meaning of the East-West and the North-South axes in the United States had changed dramatically. Thousands of black and white U.S. troops had fought on European soil for the first time in World War I. Despite Woodrow Wilson’s advocacy of self-determination for European...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 217-229

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 231-245

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 247-252