Front Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Table of Contents

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p. v

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Foreword

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pp. vii-viii

The response to this question could not be a simplistic one. The answers are many and varied. But the most important and certainly the best answer we have as Dakota people is “Thank you.” Thank you for asking that one question that will open up decades, generations of stories, information, answers, and ideas that we have to share with the world....

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Introduction

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pp. 3-10

Minnesota is a Dakota place. The Dakota people named it and left their marks in the landscape and in its history. Yet the relationship of the Dakota people to their traditional lands in Minnesota is little understood by Minnesotans today. Many history books describe the Dakota as...

Pronunciation Guide

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p. 11

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1. Homelands

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pp. 13-30

Mni Sota Makoce. The land where the waters are so clear they reflect the clouds. This land is where our grandmothers’ grandmothers’ grandmothers played as children. Carried in our collective memories are stories of this place that reach beyond...

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2. Reading Between the Lines of the Historical Record

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pp. 31-80

Minnesota is rich with Dakota places. Dakota history is encoded in the land and landscape of the state and the surrounding region. The challenge is to find that history wherever and however it is recorded—and to understand it. Historians...

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3. Dakota Landscape in the Nineteenth Century

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pp. 81-132

The Dakota knew Mni Sota Makoce as a network of connected places, each defined in specific ways. They followed a seasonal way of life, hunting game in the woods in winter, pursuing buffalo on the plains in summer, gathering edible plants in the woods and wetlands, fishing in the rivers and lakes, ricing and growing gardens on...

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4. Drawing Lines on Sacred Land: The Dakota Treaties

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pp. 133-196

Mni Sota Makoce is a rich and diverse land that gave birth to the Dakota people eons ago. As the mother and grandmother of the Dakota people, it has sustained them for countless generations. For the Dakota the land was animate, a relative, a mother. When Dakota people greet each other they often say, as...

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5. Reclaiming Minnesota—Mni Sota Makoce

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pp. 197-223

The treaties of 1851 marked the beginning of the Dakota’s exile from their homelands in Minnesota. The Dakota people were not given a permanent home in which to live, and efforts to confine them to the region of the Upper Minnesota River began before...

Contributor Statements and Acknowledgments

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pp. 225-234

Notes

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pp. 235-251

Bibliography

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pp. 253-262

Index

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pp. 263-272

Image Credits

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p. 273

Images

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pp. 281-296