Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. iii-iv

Contents

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pp. vii-vii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xi

Constance Fenimore Woolson’s letters, gathered for the first time in The Complete Letters of Constance Fenimore Woolson, remove Woolson not only from the “awful silence” that her sister Clara Benedict wrote of in her letter to May Harris, but also from the shadow of Henry James, with whom many scholars have associated her to ...

A Note on the Text

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pp. xiii-xv

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xvii-xvii

The task of finding and collating letters that Woolson rarely dated by year has been enormous, and I could not have completed it without the help and encouragement of numerous people. Kristin Comment began the project with me and purchased and transcribed many of the early letters. With Kathleen Diffley’s prompting, ...

Sources

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pp. xix-xxi

Chronology

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pp. xxiii-xix

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Introduction: Twenty Years a Wanderer

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pp. xxxi-xl

On July 4, 1893, Constance Woolson wrote from Venice to her niece Kate Mather, “It is a curious fate that has made the most domestic woman in the world,—the one most fond of a home, a fixed home, and all her own things about her,—that has made such a woman a wanderer for nearly twenty years.” On this Fourth of July, herOn July 4, 1893, Constance Woolson wrote from Venice to her niece Kate Mather, “It is a curious fate that has made the most domestic woman in the world,—the one most fond of a home, a fixed home, and all her own things about her,—that has made such a woman a wanderer for nearly twenty years.” On this Fourth of July, her ...

Selected Bibliography

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pp. xli-xlii

LETTERS

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pp. 1-563

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ADDENDUM OF LETTERS

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pp. 565-580

For the sake of her own and her correspondents’ privacy, Woolson apparently burned numerous letters she received from other people. Many scholars also believe that Henry James burned letters written to her when he helped clean out her apartment at the Casa Semitecolo after her death. The few letters to survive and ...

Appendix of Names

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pp. 581-598

Index

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pp. 599-609

About the Author

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pp. 610-610