Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

PREFACE

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xxviii

This is a book about how physicists take hold of the world, actually about how some physicists get hold of some of the world. To an outsider watching physicists work, the details of that work and the physicist’s obsessive concerns make little sense unless one has some idea what physicists are up to, what their various goals or purposes are. ...

read more

1. THE DIVISION OF LABOR: THE FACTORY

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-35

The argument is: The workings of Nature are analogized to a factory with its division of labor. But here the laborers are of three sorts: walls, particles, and fields. Walls are in effect the possibility of shielding and separation; particles are the possibility of sources and localization; and fields allow for conservation laws and path dependence. ...

read more

2. TAKING APART AND PUTTING TOGETHER: THE CLOCKWORKS, THE CALCULUS, AND THE COMPUTER

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 36-69

The argument is: Parts are degrees of freedom, they are strategies, and they are commitments. In the first chapter the operative model was the division of labor in manufacture and in political economy. Now we ask just what kinds of individuals are suitable for a factory or for an economy of Nature. ...

read more

3. FREEDOM AND NECESSITY: FAMILY AND KINSHIP

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 70-90

The argument is: There is a remarkable analogy between kinship systems, particle physics, chemistry, and market economies. All may be accounted for by stories of fair exchange: of women, elementary particles, electrons, and currency and goods, respectively. ...

read more

4. THE VACUUM AND THE CREATION: SETTING A STAGE

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 91-122

The argument is: This chapter describes a set of strategies employed by physicists for achieving a comparatively simple world: They find an orderly emptiness – a “vacuum” that is much like our everyday notions of an empty space, properly understood. And in that vacuum, degrees of freedom that are in accord with that orderliness show them- selves most effectively. ...

read more

5. HANDLES, PROBES, AND TOOLS: A RHETORIC OF NATURE

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 123-149

The argument is: Philosophy has often projected a visual analogy of knowledge – the knower as spectator – into its discussions of science. But physicists speak of what they are doing in terms of an Archimedean, haptic, and instrumental analogy. They sensitively get hold of the world (the Archimedean fulcrum) and so get a feel for it; ...

read more

6. PRODUCTION MACHINERY: MATHEMATICS FOR ANALYSIS AND DESCRIPTION

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 150-165

The argument is: Mathematics provides machinery for modeling Nature, physicists customizing that mathematics so that it does the work of physics and of Nature, and along the way that machin- ery allows us to analyze and understand physical phenomena. ...

read more

7. AN EPITOME

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 166-168

Physicists’ theories and pictures of Nature are analogies with everyday phenomena and objects (hereafter, “objects”) such as a factory, a mechanism, or family relationships. How physicists get hold of the world through those analogies is the way Nature is for them. They understand each analogy in a highly stylized and particular way, and to so understand Nature is to be trained as a physicist.1 ...

NOTES

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 169-206

INDEX

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 207-218

About the Author

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 219-219