In this Book

Indiana University Press
buy this book Buy This Book in Print
summary

In 1907, Indiana passed the world's first involuntary sterilization law based on the theory of eugenics. In time, more than 30 states and a dozen foreign countries followed suit. Although the Indiana statute was later declared unconstitutional, other laws restricting immigration and regulating marriage on "eugenic" grounds were still in effect in the U.S. as late as the 1970s. A Century of Eugenics in America assesses the history of eugenics in the United States and its status in the age of the Human Genome Project. The essays explore the early support of compulsory sterilization by doctors and legislators; the implementation of eugenic schemes in Indiana, Georgia, California, Minnesota, North Carolina, and Alabama; the legal and social challenges to sterilization; and the prospects for a eugenics movement basing its claims on modern genetic science.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Preface & Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-xi
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Introduction: Looking Back at Eugenics
  2. pp. 1-8
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part 1. The Indiana Origins of Eugenic Sterilization
  2. p. 9
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 1. The Hoosier Connection: Compulsory Sterilization as Moral Hygiene
  2. pp. 11-25
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 2. The Indiana Way of Eugenics: Sterilization Laws, 1907–74
  2. pp. 26-41
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part 2. Eugenics and Popular Culture
  2. p. 43
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 3. From Better Babies to the Bunglers: Eugenics on Tobacco Road
  2. pp. 45-67
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 4. “Quality, Not Mere Quantity, Counts”: Black Eugenics and the NAACP Baby Contests
  2. pp. 68-92
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part 3. State Studies of Eugenic Sterilization
  2. p. 93
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 5. From Legislation to Lived Experience: Eugenic Sterilization in California and Indiana, 1907–79
  2. pp. 95-116
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 6. Eugenics and Social Welfare in New Deal Minnesota
  2. pp. 117-140
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 7. Reassessing Eugenic Sterilization: The Case of North Carolina
  2. pp. 141-160
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 8. Protection or Control? Women’s Health, Sterilization Abuse, and Relf v. Weinberger
  2. pp. 161-190
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part 4. Eugenics in the Human Genome Era
  2. p. 191
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 9. Are We Entering a “Perfect Storm” for a Resurgence of Eugenics? Science, Medicine, and Their Social Context
  2. pp. 193-218
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 10. Modern Eugenics and the Law
  2. pp. 219-240
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. List of Contributors
  2. pp. 241-242
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 243-251
  3. restricted access Download |
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.